AIS Cultural Immersion

Absorbing culture first-hand

Each year, there are multiple opportunities to participate in various levels of immersion into Indian culture — some one campus, some in regional Indigenous communities, and groups have traveled throughout the U.S. to interact and conduct service-learning projects. Sometimes the immersion experiences can be woven into regular coursework, while others take place through the student organizations in the AIS program.

American Indian Studies: Immersion opportunities

Each year, there are multiple opportunities to participate in various levels of immersion into Indian culture — some on campus, some in regional Indigenous communities, and groups have traveled throughout the U.S. to conduct service-learning projects.

We take you there

From year to year, the opportunities change, but there will always be multiple chances to get out into Indian communities and learn about history and culture in ways that just aren't possible in Blugold classrooms. 

Here is a sampling of immersion experiences offered in the current and recent academic years:

  • AIS 491: Contemporary Indian Communities: First Nations & Elder-in-Residence Program at UW-Green Bay
  • AIS 322:  Native Geography: Menominee Tribal Enterprises and Menominee Cultural and Logging Museums
  • AIS 343 Contemporary Indian Communities: Prairie Islnad Reservation, MN (Sp '14)
  • AIS 343 Contemporary Indian Communities: Oneida Nation,  Tsyunhehkwa Program, Green Bay
AIS students experiencing cultural immersion on horseback

Making the cultural connections

Many AIS courses have a a field trip component, getting students out of the classroom on occasion and into the communities they are studying. Our state offers a wide variety of native communities to visit, and the richness of these interpersonal interactions is immeasurable for student growth. 

These fields trip are used as a way to allow students to apply what they have learned in classrooms, within a community. All of these immersion experiences are followed by an essay assignment, asking students to reflect on the community as it stands today in relation to the history and culture they've studied. Additionally, students need to be able to relate the importance of the traditional culture and values of communities, and how those are expressed in contemporary times.

Taylor Younkle and other AIS students on the Pine Ridge immersion experience. Pictured at Badlands National Park.

A love for Lakota country

For three years, the American Indian Studies program sponsored a cultural immersion experience at Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Find out about this unique service-oriented immersion.

Third time's a charm?
Lake Superior, North Shore

Water is Life

Join AIS professors James Oberly and Heather Ann Moody for a spring break spent visiting three reservations and a refinery, examining the Lake Superior Watershed and the implications for Indian tribes.

Vital resources
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