NLM grant supports integration of augmented reality and mobile devices into simulation scenarios

The College of Nursing and Health Sciences has received a $7770 Technology Enhancement Award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine/Greater Midwest Region. The College will use the funds to expand and strengthen simulation instruction by adding the Augmented Reality Integrated Simulation Education (ARISE) project to the available simulation resources.

ARISE, a Wisconsin-based web application that combines simulation, augmented reality and game-based learning theory, enhances student engagement during simulation activities. ARISE relies on the use of iPads and QR codes which are attached to various locations on a manikin to retrieve and access high quality audio, video and patient and biomedical information before, during and after clinical simulation scenarios. Students will utilize iPads, QR codes, ARISE and other biomedical applications to learn and practice new skills, improve clinical competencies, and develop effective team communication in a safe, controlled environment. In addition to the technology, the ARISE project has sixty-plus scenarios designed and available to nurse educators at no cost.  
 
Assistant Professor and Interim Director of the Clinical Learning Center, Megan Lagunas, PhD, MEd, RN, CCRN and Learning Resource Coordinator, Jan Adams, MLIS submitted their application, entitled SIMobile, to the NNLM/GMR to purchase iPads and ancillary equipment and supplies. Dr. Gunnar Larson, Associate Director of the Clinical Learning Center and Assistant Professor, will assist in implementing the project.

 “I am excited to add the ARISE project to the available simulation resources available for both students and faculty. The ARISE project and the integration of mobile devices and applications into simulation activities provides as an opportunity for rich learning environments with increased ease and flexibility,”  said Dr. Lagunas. “The goal of the SIMobile is to incorporate quality digital simulation experiences that advance the education of undergraduate and graduate nurses and bring simulation to life as students prepare, manage and reflect on clinical cases.”

Visit the ARISE site. ARISE is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License and is free to use.

“Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Library of Medicine of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UG4LM012346. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.”