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Community Antigen Testing

Asymptomatic testing available to all

UW-Eau Claire is now offering free antigen testing to asymptomatic members of the Eau Claire community to help contain the spread of novel coronavirus.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is partnering with the UW System to provide free antigen testing. Testing will be available in February to help us stem the surge of cases in Wisconsin. The outcome will be greatly enhanced testing so that we can identify, isolate and treat those who are positive, including those who are asymptomatic and at risk of spreading the virus unknowingly.

Everyone is encouraged to register online to be tested as soon as possible and to continue asymptomatic testing as often as desired. The test is painless, easy and will help us keep everyone safer.

Register for community antigen testing here

Expanded antigen testing now available

Thanks to a unique partnership between UW System and the federal department of Health and Human Services, UW-Eau Claire has received thousands of rapid BinaxNOW antigen tests and has opened a new, asymptomatic testing center at Zorn Arena on campus. Our goal is to test as many people without symptoms as possible.

By using painless, self-administered nasal swabs, we can identify people who may not know they are positive and quickly get them quarantined so they don’t spread the virus. It’s one of the best ways to stem the surge in Wisconsin and keep our campus healthy. All students, faculty and staff are strongly encouraged to take the time to get tested.

Watch the video to learn more about the expanded antigen testing and how it will help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Testing sites and times

Eau Claire Campus

Zorn Arena

Tests are available for: Community members
Testing dates and times: Tuesdays, 4:30-8 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Note: Registration required. On-site registration is available. 
Additional details: This site includes antigen testing and an immediate, confirming PCR test in line with the Wisconsin Department of Health Services' existing protocol for anyone testing positive. Testing will take only about 30 minutes. The testing is intended to identify asymptomatic individuals who are positive for COVID-19 and are at risk of spreading the virus unknowingly. 

Community members coming to campus for testing are encouraged to park in the Hibbard Parking Lot, just west of State Street. Visitors can park in any available F, COVID-19 Testing, or ADA-designated parking stall after 3 p.m. Parking is available in G designated parking stalls after 6 p.m. No permits are required and no payment required in AMP Timed Parking zones on the weekends.

Individuals are asked to bring a smartphone capable of accessing their email account when they visit Zorn Arena for a scheduled test.

Access to the building for testing will be through the main doors on the north side of Zorn Arena.

Register for community antigen testing here

Parking for Community Members being tested at Zorn Arena

Hibbard Parking Lot

Tuesdays: After 3 p.m., park in any available F, COVID-19 Testing, or ADA-designated parking stall. After 6 p.m., you may park in any available G designated parking stall.  

Saturdays & Sundays: No permits required and no payment required in AMP Timed Parking zones.

Note: If you park on any city street near the university, please follow city and campus parking signs. 

Campus map-Hibbard Lot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barron Campus

Tests are available for: Community members
Testing dates and times: Every Tuesday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. in the gym; Free community testing through April 6
Note: Registration is required
Additional details: The testing is intended to identify asymptomatic individuals who are positive for COVID-19 and are at risk of spreading the virus unknowingly.

Register for community antigen testing here

UWEC student, faculty and staff testing

If you are a UWEC student, faculty or staff member, click here for antigen and COVID-19 testing information

Understanding your rapid antigen test results

To best understand what your rapid antigen test results mean, you must first determine if you are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms.  

These include: 

If you have:

If you do not have symptoms, and your rapid antigen test result is negative:

You most likely do not have COVID-19 at this time. This test did not detect SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, when your specimen was collected.

However, you still may be an asymptomatic carrier or acquire the virus later. If you are a close contact of someone with COVID, you need to complete your quarantine. If you are not in quarantine, continue physical distancing, wearing a mask and washing your hands frequently.

If you have symptoms, and your rapid antigen test result is negative:

You may still be infected with SARS-CoV-2. Get a confirmatory test today. PCR testing is located in the Alumni Room 350 Davies. Results may take up to four days.

While waiting for these results, isolate at home, monitor symptoms and stay in touch with your doctor. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), seek emergency medical care immediately. Isolation means that you do not go to work, school or public areas; remain in a separate room in your home and use a separate bathroom if possible; don’t share personal items; and follow all standard safety protocols.

If you do not have symptoms, and your rapid antigen test result is positive:

Get a confirmatory test today. Results may take up to four days.

While waiting for these results, isolate at home, monitor symptoms and stay in touch with your doctor. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), seek emergency medical care immediately. Isolation means that you do not go to work, school or public areas; remain in a separate room in your home and use a separate bathroom if possible; don’t share personal items; and follow all standard safety protocols.

You have symptoms, and your rapid antigen test result is positive:

You are infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. You should isolate at home except to get medical care if your symptoms worsen.

Stay in touch with your doctor and monitor your symptoms. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), seek emergency medical care immediately. Isolation means that you do not go to work, school or public areas; remain in a separate room in your home and use a separate bathroom if possible; don’t share personal items; and follow all standard safety protocols.

Your rapid antigen test result is indeterminate:

There was an error with your test, and we need to repeat it. Please get retested.

If you've been told to isolate

If you’ve been instructed to separate yourself from other people in your home, also called “isolation,” you will need to know when it is safe to stop your isolation.

If you are waiting for a second (confirmatory) test result:

You must isolate until you receive your second test result, which may take 3-4 days.

If you have been diagnosed with COVID-19:

After being diagnosed with COVID-19, even if you don’t have symptoms, you will need to isolate and self-monitor until you are no longer able to spread COVID-19 to others.

Common questions regarding isolation:

Home isolation is over when:

  1. You have been fever-free for at least 24 hours without using medicine that reduces fevers.
  2. Your other symptoms have improved for at least 24 hours.
  3. At least 10 days have passed since you first had symptoms.

You should still stay isolated for at least 10 days after you were tested.

You can spread COVID-19 to others beginning two days before your symptoms start until a few days after you recover. Even if you never develop any symptoms, you may be able to spread COVID-19 to others.

Notifying your own close contacts of their exposure to COVID-19 can help limit the spread in your community. Any close contact, except those who had COVID-19 within the previous 3 months and have no symptoms, should stay home and watch for symptoms for 14 days after they last had close contact with you.

First, you need to determine the time period during which you could have exposed others. If you have symptoms, you were able to spread COVID-19 starting two days before your first symptoms started.

If you have not had any symptoms, you were able to spread COVID-19 starting two days before your positive COVID-19 test was taken.

You should notify anyone with whom you had close contact while able to spread COVID-19.

Close contact is defined as any of the following interactions:

  • Having direct physical contact with someone. (e.g. hug, kiss, handshake)
  • Being within 6 feet of someone for 15 minutes total in a day.
  • Having contact with your respiratory secretions. (e.g. coughed/sneezed on, contact with dirty tissue, sharing a drinking glass, food, towels or other personal items)
  • Living with or spending the night with someone.

CDC and Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) recommend that close contacts quarantine in their home for a period of 7 to 14 days, beginning the last day they were exposed to you. This should be done regardless of whether your contact receives a negative test during their quarantine period because they could develop symptoms 2 to 14 days after being exposed.

Your contact may receive a call from Public Health who will ask your contact some questions and provide additional information. Please ask your contact to answer the phone call.

The DHS fact sheet called “Next steps: close contacts of someone with COVID-19” will provide more details for what to do to protect others.

If your contact has additional questions, they can contact their primary care provider, local health agency or visit the Wisconsin DHS COVID-19 Website dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/diagnosed.htm.

There is an online tool called “Tell Your Contacts” which allows for anonymous text or email notifications.

To send notifications from this tool:

  1. Visit tellyourcontacts.org.
  2. Select email or text notification.
  3. Enter your contacts’ information and exposure date.
  4. Select either the pre-written message or customize your own. You do not need to enter your name.
  5. Send your message.

Questions?

If you have any questions, be sure to follow up with your health care provider. You may also contact Wisconsin Health Connect at wihealthconnect.com and receive a call back from a nurse within 24 hours.