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Pre-Health Tracks

Pre-Health Tracks

Pre-Professional health science programs prepare students for entry into professional degree programs through organized academic planning and preparation. UW-Eau Claire's rigorous and respected academics offer strong training and preparation for entry into the health professions. In addition there are multiple campus organizations and local opportunities for students interested in pursuing a health professional career.

We’re here to open doors to careers in health care. We help students explore health career options and guide them along the path to a successful career in the health sciences.

Dr. Julie Anderson Director, UW-Eau Claire Health Careers Center

Pre-Professional Health Sciences Programs

Athletic trainers (ATs) are highly qualified, multi-skilled health care professionals who collaborate with physicians to provide preventative services, emergency care, clinical diagnosis, therapeutic intervention and rehabilitation of injuries and medical conditions. Athletic trainers work under the direction of a physician as prescribed by state licensure statutes. Athletic training encompasses the prevention, examination, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of emergent, acute or chronic injuries and medical conditions. Athletic training is recognized by the American Medical Association (AMA), Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as an allied health care profession.

Athletic Trainers can be found working in many settings, including public and private secondary schools, colleges and universities, professional and Olympic sports, independently owned youth sports facilities, physicians’ practices (similar to nurses, physician’s assistants, physical therapists, and other clinical healthcare professionals), rural and urban hospitals, hospital emergency rooms, urgent and ambulatory care centers, sports medicine clinics, police and fire departments and academies, branches of the military, and in the performing arts including professional and collegiate-level dance and music programs.

Pre-Athletic Training at UWEC

Pre-Athletic Training is a program of study, not an academic major.  No specific academic major is required for pre-Athletic Training. The majority of students will choose one of the following majors in UWEC’s Department of Kinesiology to complete their pre-Athletic Training requirements:

  • Exercise Science
  • Rehabilitation Science

Admission Requirements:

Requirements will vary by school, due to differently-structured programs.  Students should research and identify early which schools they plan to apply to, so that the undergraduate experience can be planned accordingly.  Application to UWEC’s Master’s in Athletic Training program will require:

  • A completed Bachelor's degree with any major from an accredited institution.
  • Completion of all prerequisite courses.
  • Competitive overall and science GPAs.
  • Observational experience in Athletic Training (50- 100 hours).
  • Letters of recommendation (at least one from a licensed Athletic Trainer).
  • Completed application with Athletic Training Centralized Application Service (ATCAS).
  • Face-to-face interview with UWEC Athletic Training faculty.

Required Pre-AT Courses for UWEC’s Athletic Training program: (Admission requirements and prerequisites may differ for other school’s programs, so it is important to check for specific requirements.)

Courses

Required Credits

Suggested UWEC Courses

Human Anatomy and Physiology

2 semesters

BIOL 214 and 314 (8cr)

General Chemistry

1 semester

CHEM 105 and CHEM 106 (5cr)

Statistics

1 semester

MATH 246 (4cr)

Physics

1semesters

PHYS 100 (4cr) or PHYS 211 (5cr)

Biomechanics

1 semester

KINS 304 (3cr)

Exercise Physiology

1 semester

KINS 308 (3cr)

Strength & Conditioning

1 semester

KINS 357 (3cr)

Psychology

1 semester

PSYC 100 (3cr)

Human Nutrition

1 semester

BIOL 196 (3cr)

Recommended Courses: The following courses are recommended by some athletic training programs:

ENPH 450 Epidemiology

PSYC 230 Human Development

ENPH 225 Introduction to Public Health

PSYC 331 Child Psychology

KINS 275 Care & Prevention of Athletic Injuries

PSYC 332 Psychology of Adolescence

KINS 292 Coaching & Management Theory

Graduate Record Exam (GRE): Although this exam is not required for application to UWEC’s Athletic Training program, it may be required by other schools’ programs. The exam consists of 3 sections, Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning and Analytical Writing. It is often taken in the spring semester or summer following the junior year. Go to: http://www.ets.org/gre for more information on the GRE.

Suggested Pre-AT Curriculum: The following program is suggested for a student in any major.  It is important that students work with a pre-AT advisor each semester. This is one example of how the pre-AT courses can be arranged. Courses will not necessarily be taken in this order. The order of courses taken will depend on the student’s major.

Freshman year – Fall

KINS 294

PSYC 100

LE & Major courses

Freshman year – Spring

PHYS 100 or 211

CHEM 105 & 106

LE & Major courses

Sophomore year – Fall

BIOL 214

KINS 304

BIOL 196

LE & Major courses

Sophomore year – Spring

BIOL 314

MATH 246*

KINS 308

Additional science course

Junior year – Fall

KINS 357

LE & Major courses

(Prepare for GRE)

Junior year – Spring

LE & Major courses

(Take GRE and apply to schools in summer)

Senior year – Fall

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

Senior year – Spring

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

UWEC Pre-AT Advisors:

Dr. Corey Hannah (hannahcm@uwec.edu)

Dr. Anita Huang (huangyul@uwec.edu)

Dr. Bob Stow (stowrc@uwec.edu)

See a Life & Health Sciences Academic Advisor in the Advising, Retention and Career Center

More Information:

Some schools in our region with graduate programs in Athletic Training:

Learn more here!

Printable Pre Athletic Training Advising Sheet

The primary focus of chiropractic is the relationship of the neurological and structural systems of the body as they relate to health. The responsibilities of a doctor of chiropractic include wellness promotion, health assessment, diagnosis and the chiropractic management of the patient’s health care needs. When indicated, a doctor of chiropractic consults with, co-manages, or refers to other health care providers.

Pre-chiropractic is a program of study, not an academic major. No specific academic major is required in the pre-chiropractic program. The majority of students will choose one of the following majors to complete their pre-chiropractic requirements:

  • Kinesiology comprehensive major with emphasis in Rehabilitation Science or Exercise Science
  • Biology standard major

Admission Requirements:

  • A minimum of 90 semester hours of college education (Bachelor's degree with any major from an accredited institution is required to practice in many states)
  • Completion of all prerequisite courses
  • Competitive overall and science GPAs (3.0 overall average for those accepted)
  • Competitive Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score (required for some programs)
  • Observation or work experience with a licensed chiropractor
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Completed application with Chiropractic Centralized Application Service (ChiroCAS) (for some programs)
  • Face-to-face interview required by many programs

Required Pre-Chiropractic Courses: (Admission requirements and prerequisites may differ from school to school so it is important to check with schools for specific requirements.)

Courses

Required Credits

Suggested UWEC Courses

English

6 credits

WRIT 116

Biology

6 credits w/lab

BIOL 214 & 314 (8cr) or BIOL 221 & 222/223

Chemistry

12 credits; at least 6 cr with lab

CHEM 105 & CHEM 106 & CHEM 109 (8-9cr); CHEM 325 (4cr)

Physics

6 credits w/lab

PHYS 211 & KINS 304 (Biomechanical), KINS 308 (Exercise Phys) or Math 246

Psychology

3 credits

PSYC 100 (3cr)

Social Science or Humanities

15 credits

LE courses

Non-Academic Considerations: Applicants must provide evidence of ability to communicate, relating with others, involvement in extracurricular activities, character, integrity, emotional stability, and motivation for chiropractic. The strongest applicants have experience volunteering or working with a chiropractor.

Graduate Record Exam (GRE): This standardized exam is required for admission to some chiropractic programs. The exam consists of 3 sections, Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning and Analytical Writing. It is often taken in the spring semester or summer following the junior year. Go to: http://www.ets.org/gre for more information on the GRE.

Suggested Pre-Chiropractic Curriculum: The following program is suggested for a student in any major.  It is important that students work with a pre-chiropractic advisor each semester. This is one example of how the pre-Chiro courses can be arranged.  They do not necessarily need to be taken in this exact order, and certain majors will require taking them in a different order. Work closely with your major and pre-Chiro advisor to determine the best order for you and your major.

Freshman year – Fall

Math*

Writ 116

Chem 105 + 106

LE and major courses

Freshman year – Spring

Math

Phys 211

Chem 109

Kins 294

LE and major courses

Sophomore year – Fall

Biol 214

Psyc 100

Kins 304 or 308

LE and major courses

Sophomore year – Spring

Biol 314

Additional science

LE and major courses

Junior year – Fall

Chem 325

LE and major courses

Junior year – Spring

LE and major courses

(Apply to chiro programs in summer)

Senior year – Fall

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

Senior year– Spring

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

*Beginning course in mathematics depends on UWEC Mathematics Placement Exam score

 

UWEC Pre-Chiropractic Advisors:

          Ms. Michelle Mattes (mattesm@uwec.edu)

          Dr. Marquell Johnson (johnmarq@uwec.edu)

          Dr. Saori Braun (braunsi@uwec.edu)

          See a Life & Health Science Advisor in the Advising, Retention and Career Center

 More Information:

 

Learn more here!

Printable Pre-Chiro Advising sheet

Pre-Dentistry is a program of study, not an academic major. Dental school admissions committees consider applicants from a wide variety of academic backgrounds, as long as, they have completed the core group of pre‐dent courses, including the basic preparatory work for the Dental Admission Test (DAT). A student’s major should be one that the student enjoys and will support an alternative career. There are 65 dental schools in the United States, that award advanced professional degrees of either Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) or Doctor of Medical Dentistry (DMD). Although there is not a specific required major for pre-dentistry students, many students choose one of the following majors:

  • Biology standard major and chemistry OR pre-professional health science minor
  • Biology comprehensive major in Microbiology
  • Biochemistry/Molecular Biology Comprehensive Major
  • Chemistry Comprehensive Major

Admission Requirements:

  • Bachelor's degree with any major from an accredited institution is required by most
  • Completion of all prerequisite courses
  • Competitive overall and science GPAs (3.4 overall average for those accepted)
  • Competitive Dental Admission Test (DAT) score
  • Experience in a dental/oral health office or clinic
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Completed application with American Association of Dental Schools Application Service (AADSAS) (for some programs)
  • Face-to-face interview

Required Pre-Dentistry Courses: (Admission requirements and prerequisites may differ from school to school, so it is important to check with schools for specific requirements.)

Courses

Required Credits

Marquette University

Required Credits

University of MN

Suggested UWEC Courses

English

6

8

WRIT 116 (5cr) + an addl ENGL course

Mathematics

-

3

MATH 109 [+ MATH 112 or 113 & 114] to complete BS/Biol requirement (4+cr)

Inorganic chemistry

8

8

CHEM 105 & CHEM 106 & CHEM 109 (8-9cr) or CHEM 115* (6cr)

Organic chemistry

8

8

CHEM 325 & 326 (8cr)

Biochemistry

3

3

CHEM 352 (4cr) or CHEM 452 (3cr)

Physics

8

8

PHYS 211 & 212 (9cr) or PHYS 231 & 232 (10cr)

Biology

8

8

BIOL 221 & 222 & 223 (9cr)

Psychology

-

3

PSYC 100 (3cr)

*CHEM 115 requires a strong background in high school math and chemistry

Recommended Courses: Many students find the following courses to be helpful in dental school courses and in achieving competitive scores on the DAT:  

Biol 323 Genetics and Biol 324 Lab

Biol 361 Biology of Microorganisms    

Phil 306 Ethics of Health Care

Biol 306 Infectious Disease Ecology

Biol 402 Topics in Virology & Immunology    

Psychology courses (Psyc 331 or 332)

Biol 317 Animal Physiology  

Biol 470 Neurobiology       

Art courses in drawing or sculpture

Biol 354 Advanced Nutrition                 

Math 246 Statistics

Dental Admission Test (DAT): This standardized exam is required for admission into dental school. The exam consists of 4 parts: (1) natural sciences (biology & chemistry), (2) reading comprehension, (3) quantitative reasoning (math), and (4) perceptual ability. The test is offered by computer at Prometric Learning Centers at various locations around the country (https://www.prometric.com/). It is often taken in the spring semester of the junior year. There is a 90-day waiting period before the test can be taken a second time. Go to: http://www.ada.org/dat.aspx for more information on the DAT.

Non-Academic Considerations: Applicants are required to obtain experience in the dental profession. This should include experiences with a variety of dental specialties and is typically done through several dentists or dental care providers. These healthcare professionals can provide important recommendations to support your application to dental school. Seek out health related experiences, job shadowing and volunteering opportunities early!

Suggested Pre-Dentistry Curriculum:

The following program is suggested for a student with a biology major and is designed to take the Dental Admission Test (DAT) in the junior year. It is important that students work with a pre-dent advisor each semester.

Freshman year – Fall

Biol 221

Chem 105+106 or 115 *

Math 109, 112, 113, or 114 **

LE course or Writ 116

Freshman year – Spring

Biol 222/223

Chem 109 or 115*

Math 112, 113, or 114**

Sophomore year – Fall

Biol 300-level

Chem 325

LE course or additional math

LE course or Wellness course

Sophomore year – Spring

Biol 300-level

Chem 326

LE courses

Junior year – Fall

Biol 300- level

Biol 300-level

Physics 211

Engl elective

Junior year– Spring

Biol 300- level

Chem 352

Physics 212

LE course (Take DAT In Spring and complete AADSAS application in May-June)

Senior year– Fall

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended/required courses

(Retake DAT in early fall if necessary)

Senior year – Spring

Complete Major/Minor/LE requirements

Additional recommended/required courses

UWEC Pre-Dentistry Advisors:

Dr. Jamie Lyman-Gingerich (lymangjs@uwec.edu)

Dr. Julie Anderson (anderju@uwec.edu)      

See a Life & Health Science Advisor in the Advising, Retention and Career Center             

 

More Information:

Brian Trecek, Director of Admissions                                 Univ. of Minnesota School of Dentistry

Marquette School of Dentistry                                            Office of Admissions

brian.trecek@marquette.edu                                          ddsapply@umn.edu

 

Learn more here!

Printable Pre-Dental Advising sheet

Pre-Medicine is a program of study, not an academic major. Medical school admissions committees consider applicants from a wide variety of academic backgrounds, as long as they have completed the core group of pre-med courses, including the basic preparatory work for the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). In other words, there is no “official” pre-med major. A student’s major should be one that the student enjoys and will support an alternative career. Demonstrated ability in the sciences is of greater importance to admissions committees than the chosen major or the number of science courses taken. There are 136 allopathic medical schools (MD) and 26 osteopathic medical schools (DO) in the United States, each taking four years to complete. The first two years consist of classroom and laboratory work in the basic sciences; the final two years are devoted to clinical training. MDs and DOs enter a residency program of three or more years directly after medical school to gain advanced clinical training in their specialty.

Admission Requirements:

  • Bachelor's degree with any major from an accredited institution
  • Completion of all prerequisite courses
  • Competitive overall and science GPAs (3.7 overall average for those accepted)
  • Competitive Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) score
  • Healthcare experience and/or shadowing
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Completed application with American Medical College Application Service (AAMCAS) or American Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS)
  • Face-to-face interview

Required Pre-Medicine Courses: (Admission requirements and prerequisites may differ from school to school so it is important to check with schools for specific requirements.)

Courses

Required Credits

Suggested UWEC Courses

English

2 semesters

WRIT 116 (5cr) & addl writing intensive course

Mathematics

 

Trigonometry, Calculus and Statistics

MATH 109 [+ MATH 112 or 113 & 114] and MATH 246

Inorganic chemistry

2 semesters w/lab

CHEM 105 & CHEM 106 & CHEM 109 (8-9cr) or CHEM 115* (6cr)

Organic chemistry

2 semesters w/lab

CHEM 325 & 326 (8cr)

Biochemistry

1 semester

CHEM 352 (4cr) or CHEM 452 (3cr)

Physics

2 semesters w/lab

PHYS 211 & 212 (9cr) or PHYS 231 & 232 (10cr)

Biology

2 semesters w/lab

BIOL 221 & 222 & 223 (9cr)

*CHEM 115 requires a strong background in high school math and chemistry

Medical College Admission Test (MCAT): This standardized exam is required for admission to nearly all MD and DO schools. The exam consists of 4 parts: (1) Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems, (2) Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems, (3) Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior, and (4) Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills.  It is taken in the spring semester or summer following the junior or senior year. More information on the MCAT: www.aamc.org/students/applying/mcat/.

Strongly Recommended Courses: Many students find the following courses to be helpful in medical school courses and in achieving competitive scores on the MCAT:

Biol 323 Genetics and Biol 324 Lab

Biol 361 Biology of Microorganisms   

Phil 306 Ethics of Health Care

Biol 305 Molecular and Cell Biology

Biol 380 Endocrinology   

Psychology and Sociology courses

Biol 317 Animal Physiology

Biol 402 Topics in Virology & Immunology

Courses in languages, communications, literature, history, philosophy, music, art 

Biol 319 Animal Form and Function

Biol 470 Neurobiology    

Non-Academic Considerations: Applicants must obtain experience in healthcare. Seek out health-related experiences, job shadowing and volunteering opportunities early!

Suggested Pre-Medicine Curriculum:

The following program is suggested for a student in any major and is designed to take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) in the junior year. It is important that students work with a pre-med advisor each semester. For more information look at the AAMC Timeline

Freshman year – Fall

Biol 221

Chem 105+106 or 115*

Math 109, 112, 113, or 114**

Psyc 100 or Soc 101

Freshman year – Spring

Biol 222/223

Chem 109 or 115*

Math 112, 113, or 114**

Writ 116

Sophomore year – Fall

Chem 325

Math 246

Biol 300-level

Psyc 100 or Soc 101

Sophomore year – Spring

Chem 326

Biol 300-level

LE & Major courses

Junior year – Fall

Phys 211 or 231

Chem 352 or 452

LE & Major courses

(Start preparing for MCAT)

Junior year – Spring

Phys 212 or 232

LE & Major courses

Engl elective

(Take MCAT in spring/summer and complete AMCAS [MD] or AACOMAS [DO] application in May-June)

Senior year – Fall

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

Senior year – Spring

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

*CHEM 115 requires a strong background in high school math and chemistry

** Beginning course in mathematics depends on UWEC Mathematics Placement Exam score

 

UWEC Pre-Medical Advisors

Dr. Julie Anderson (anderju@uwec.edu)

Dr. Derek Gingerich (gingerdj@uwec.edu)

Dr. Winnifred Bryant (bryantwm@uwec.edu)

Dr. Warren Gallagher (wgallagh@uwec.edu)

Dr. Dan Janik (janikds@uwec.edu)

See a Life & Health Science Advisor in the Advising, Retention and Career Center

More Information:

 

Learn more here!

Printable Pre-Med Advising sheet

Programs in occupational therapy prepare students to work with children and adults who have physical, cognitive, or emotional disabilities that interfere with their ability to function independently and engage in daily activities. Occupational therapists serve as critical members of a comprehensive treatment team, frequently consulting with physicians, physical and speech therapists, nurses, social workers, psychologists, vocational counselors, teachers, other allied health specialists, and family members. They blend a scientific knowledge of the human body and mind with an understanding of the numerous individual, social, and environmental challenges associated with disability. Occupational therapy education programs are presently at the master’s level; thus, completion of a bachelor’s degree will be required for admission. Pre-occupational therapy is a program of study, not an academic major.  No specific academic major is required in the pre-occupational therapy program.  However, most students will choose one of the following majors:  

  • Kinesiology major with emphasis in Rehabilitation Science or Exercise Science
  • Psychology major with Kinesiology minor

Admission Requirements:

  • Bachelor's degree with any major from an accredited institution
  • Completion of all prerequisite courses
  • Competitive overall and science GPAs (3.4 overall average for those accepted)
  • Competitive Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score (required for some programs)
  • Observational or work experience in occupational therapy
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Completed application with Occupational Therapy Centralized Application Service (OTCAS) (for some programs)
  • Face-to-face interview required by many programs

Required Pre-OT Courses: (Admission requirements and prerequisites may differ from school to school, so it is important to check with schools for specific requirements.)

Courses

Required Credits

Suggested UWEC Courses

Human Anatomy and Physiology

2 semesters

BIOL 214 and 314 (8cr)

Mathematics

Statistics

MATH 246 (4cr) or PSYC 265 (3cr)

Med Terminology

1 semester

NRSG 220 (1cr)

Psychology

2-3 semesters

PSYC 100, 230 and 251 (9cr)

Sociology

1 semester

SOC 101 (3cr) or ANTH 161 (3cr)

Non-Academic Considerations: All occupational therapy programs require observational or actual work experience in occupational therapy prior to admission. Check each occupational therapy school’s admissions requirements to determine the minimum number of observational hours.

Graduate Record Exam (GRE): This standardized exam is required for admission to most occupational therapy programs. The exam consists of 3 sections, Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning and Analytical Writing. It is often taken in the spring semester or summer following the junior year. Go to: http://www.ets.org/gre for more information on the GRE.

Suggested Pre-OT Curriculum: The following program is suggested for a student in any major.  It is important that students work with a pre-OT advisor each semester. This is one example of how the pre-OT courses can be arranged.  They do not necessarily need to be taken in this order, and certain majors will require taking them in a different order. Work closely with your major and pre-OT advisor to determine the best order for you and your major.

Freshman year – Fall

Math*

Chem 105 + 106

Soc 101

Writ 116

LE and major courses

Freshman year – Spring

Math

Psyc 100

NRSG 220

Kins 294

LE and major courses

Sophomore year – Fall

Biol 214

Phys 211

LE course or additional math

Sophomore year – Spring

Biol 314 or Kins 304

Math 246 or Psyc 265

Psyc 230

Additional science

Junior year – Fall

Psyc 251

Additional science

LE and major courses

Junior year – Spring

LE and major courses

 (Take GRE)

Senior year – Fall

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

Apply to OT programs

(October 1st is the last opportunity

to take GRE)

Senior year– Spring

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

UWEC Pre-Occupational Therapy Advisors:

Ms. Michelle Mattes (mattesm@uwec.edu)

Dr. Marquell Johnson (johnmarq@uwec.edu)

Dr. Saori Braun (braunsi@uwec.edu)

See a Life & Health Science Advisor in the Advising, Retention and Career Center

More Information:

Learn more here!

Printable Pre-Occupational Therapy Advising sheet

 

Optometrists are independent, primary health care providers who examine, diagnose, and treat diseases and disorders of the eye and visual system. They measure for and prescribe glasses and contacts; diagnose and treat eye coordination and focusing issues; treat eye diseases, such as glaucoma; and detect systemic diseases, such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Optometrists also perform non-invasive surgical procedures. Most optometrists are in private practice, but there is a growing trend towards working in partnerships and groups.

There are 19 accredited schools and colleges of optometry in the United States and Canada that award the degree of Doctor of Optometry (OD). Generally, colleges of optometry admit students with strong academic commitment and demonstrated potential to excel in deductive reasoning, interpersonal communication, and empathy. Optometry schools are looking for "well-rounded" candidates who have achieved not only in the classroom but also in other areas.

Admission Requirements:

  • Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution (any major)
  • Completion of all prerequisite courses
  • Competitive cumulative and prerequisite GPAs (3.4 average for those accepted)
  • Competitive Optometry Admissions Test (OAT) score
  • Optometrist shadowing hours (required by most programs)
  • Letters of recommendation (most programs require at least one from an optometrist)
  • Completed application with Optometry Centralized Application Service (OptomCAS)
  • Face-to-face interview

Required Pre-Optometry Courses: (Admission requirements and prerequisites may differ from school to school so it is important to check with schools for specific requirements.)

Courses

Required Credits

Suggested UWEC Courses

English

2 semesters

WRIT 116 (5cr) & addl ENGL course (3cr)

Mathematics

Statistics

MATH 246 (4cr); MATH 114 (4cr) for some programs

Psychology

1-2 semesters

PSYC 100 (3cr) & addl PSYC course (PSYC 230 or 251 3cr)

Inorganic chemistry

2 semesters w/lab

CHEM 105 & CHEM 106 & CHEM 109 (8-9cr) or CHEM 115* (6cr)

Organic chemistry

1 semester w/lab

CHEM 325 (4cr)

Physics

2 semesters w/lab

PHYS 211 & 212 (9cr) or PHYS 231 & 232 (10cr)

Biology

2 semesters w/lab

BIOL 221 & 222, 223 (9cr)

Microbiology

1 semester w/lab

BIOL 361 (5cr)

*CHEM 115 requires a strong background in high school math and chemistry

Optometry Admission Test (OAT): This standardized exam is required for admission to all optometry schools. The exam consists of 4 parts: Survey of the Natural Sciences (Biology, General Chemistry, and Organic Chemistry), Reading Comprehension, Physics, and Quantitative Reasoning. It is often taken in the spring semester or summer following the junior year. Go to: www.opted.org for more information on the OAT.

Non-Academic Considerations: Applicants must obtain experience with a practicing optometrist. Seek out health-related experiences, job shadowing and volunteering opportunities early!

Suggested Pre-Optometry Curriculum: The following program is suggested for a student in any major and is designed to take the Optometry Admission Test (OAT) in the junior year. It is important that students work with a pre-optometry advisor each semester.

Freshman year – Fall

MATH**

CHEM 105 + 106 or 115*

BIOL 221

WRIT 116

Freshman year – Spring

MATH

BIOL 222

BIOL 223

CHEM 109

PSYC 100

Sophomore year – Fall

CHEM 325

Upper level BIOL

MATH 246

LE & Major courses

Sophomore year – Spring

PSYC 230 (or other PSYC course)

Upper level BIOL

LE & Major courses

Junior year – Fall

PHYS 211 or 231

BIOL 361

ENGL 213 (or other ENGL course)

LE & Major courses

(Prepare for OAT)

Junior year – Spring

PHYS 212 or 232

LE & Major courses

(Take OAT and complete applications)

Senior year – Fall

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

Senior year – Spring

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

*CHEM 115 requires a strong background in high school math and chemistry

** Beginning course in mathematics depends on UWEC Mathematics Placement Exam score

UWEC Pre-Optometry Advisors:

Dr. Julie Anderson (anderju@uwec.edu)

Dr. Dan Janik (janikds@uwec.edu)

See a Life & Health Science Advisor in the Advising, Retention and Career Center

More information:

Learn more here!

Printable Pre-Optometry Advising sheet

 

Pharmacists are experts on drugs and drug therapy. Pharmacists package and dispense prescription medications, advise on use of non-prescriptive drugs, and calculate doses and prepare medicines for patients. Pharmacists with an interest in academic or research pharmacy teach in hospitals, universities, or medical schools, or pursue a career with a pharmaceutical company.  There are about 129 accredited schools of pharmacy in the United States. Pharmacy programs grant the degree of Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.). The PharmD is a 4-year program that requires at least two years of college study prior to admittance, although most applicants have earned a bachelor’s degree. Students who apply to a PharmD program without a bachelor’s degree are less competitive than those who have completed a degree.

Admission Requirements:

  • Minimum of 60-95 credits of college education (Bachelor’s degree strongly recommended)
  • Completion of all prerequisite courses
  • Competitive cumulative and prerequisite GPAs (3.6 overall average for those accepted)
  • Competitive Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) score
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Completed application with Pharmacy Centralized Application Service (PharmCAS)
  • Face-to-face interview

Required Pre-Pharmacy Courses: (Admission requirements and prerequisites may differ from school to school, so it is important to check with schools for specific requirements.)

Courses

Required Credits

Suggested UWEC Courses

English

1-2 courses (or bachelor’s degree)

WRIT 114 (5cr), 116 (5cr), or 118 (2cr); Advanced Engl

Mathematics (Calculus)

1-2 courses

MATH 111 or 114 (4+cr)

General chemistry

2 courses with lab

CHEM 105 & CHEM 106; & CHEM 109 (8-9cr) or CHEM 115* (6cr)

Organic chemistry

2 courses with lab

CHEM 325 & 326 (8cr)

Physics

1-2 courses with lab

 

PHYS 211, 212 (9cr) or PHYS 231, 232 (10cr)

General Biology

1-2 courses with lab

BIOL 221 (4cr), 222 & 223 (5cr)

Microbiology

1 course

BIOL 250 (3cr) or BIOL 361 (lab) (5cr)

Human Anatomy and Physiology

2 courses

BIOL 214 & 314 (8cr)

Advanced Biology

1 course (U of MN)

BIOL 323 (3cr), BIOL 305 (4cr) or CHEM 352 (3cr)

Statistics

1 course

MATH 245 (3cr) or MATH 246 (4cr)

Social Science

1-2 courses (or bachelor’s degree)

PSYC 100 (3cr), SOC 101 (3cr) or ANTH 161 (3cr) or LE R1 DDIV course

US Diversity/Ethnic studies

1-2 courses (or bachelor’s degree)

LE R1 DDIV course

Humanities

2 courses (or bachelor’s degree)

LE K3 Humanities course

Communication

1 course (or bachelor’s degree)

CJ202 (3cr)

*CHEM 115 requires a strong background in high school math and chemistry

Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT): This standardized exam is required for admission into pharmacy schools. The exam consists of 6 parts: Writing, Verbal Ability, Biology, Chemistry, Reading Comprehension and Quantitative Ability. It is often taken in the spring semester of the junior year. Go to: pcatweb.info for more information on the PCAT.

Non-Academic Considerations: Applicants are required to obtain experience in the pharmacy profession. Pre-pharmacy students should become knowledgeable about health care settings and should seek out job and volunteer opportunities with pharmacists. These healthcare professionals can provide important recommendations to support your application to pharmacy school. Seek out health related experiences, job shadowing and volunteering opportunities early!

Suggested Pre-Pharmacy Curriculum: The following program is suggested for a student in any major and is designed to take the Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) in the junior year. It is important that students work with a pre-pharm advisor each semester.

Freshman year – Fall

Math 109, 112, 113, or 114**

CHEM 105 + 106 or 115*

BIOL 221

WRIT 116

Freshman year – Spring

Math 112, 113, or 114**

BIOL 222/223

CHEM 109 or 115*

Social Science course/LE

Sophomore year – Fall

BIOL 214

CHEM 325

MATH 246

Social Science course/LE & Major courses

Sophomore year – Spring

BIOL 314

CHEM 326

Communications Course

LE & Major courses

Junior year – Fall

BIOL 361

PHYS 211

LE & Major courses

(Prepare for PCAT)

Junior year – Spring

PHYS 212

LE & Major courses

(Take PCAT and apply to schools in summer)

Senior year – Fall

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

Senior year – Spring

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

*CHEM 115 requires a strong background in high school math and chemistry

** Beginning course in mathematics depends on UWEC Mathematics Placement Exam score

UWEC Pre-Pharmacy Advisors:

Dr. Cheryl Muller (mullercl@uwec.edu)

Dr. Scott Bailey-Hartsel (hartsesc@uwec.edu)

Dr. Julie Anderson (anderju@uwec.edu)

See a Life & Health Science Advisor in the Advising, Retention and Career Center

More information:

Learn more here!

Printable Pre-Pharmacy Advising sheet

 

 

Physician Assistants (PAs) are health professionals who deliver a broad range of medical and surgical services. PAs are licensed to practice under the supervision of a physician (MD or DO) and state law determines the scope of their practice. In general, they take medical histories, examine and treat patients, order and interpret laboratory tests and x-rays, make diagnoses, prescribe medications, administer treatments, assist in surgery, and counsel and educate patients. PAs practice in over 60 specialty areas nationally.  PA programs are approximately 27 months long and include classroom instruction and clinical rotations. PAs also complete more than 2,000 hours of clinical rotations. There are currently 159 accredited PA programs in the United States. The vast majority award master’s degrees. Only graduates of accredited PA programs may take the Physician Assistant National Certifying Exam (PANCE).

Admission Requirements:

  • Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution
  • Completion of all prerequisite courses
  • Competitive cumulative and prerequisite GPAs (3.4 -3.8 overall average for those accepted)
  • Competitive Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score (required by some programs)
  • Direct health care experience and/or shadowing (some programs require >1,000 hours)
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Completed application with Central Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA) (for most programs)
  • Face-to-face interview

Required Pre-PA courses: (Admission requirements and prerequisites may differ from school to school so it is important to check with schools for specific requirements.)

Courses

Required Credits

Suggested UWEC Courses

Mathematics

Statistics

MATH 246

Inorganic chemistry

At least 1 semester w/lab

CHEM 105 & CHEM 106 & CHEM 109 (8-9cr) for some programs

Organic chemistry

1 semester w/lab

CHEM 325 (4cr) and CHEM 326 (4cr) for some programs

Biochemistry

1 semester

CHEM 352 (4cr) or CHEM 452 (3cr)  

Biology

2 semesters w/lab

BIOL 221 & 222 & 223 (9cr)

Human Anatomy & Physiology

2 semesters w/lab

BIOL 214 & 314 (8cr)

Microbiology

1 semester w/lab

BIOL 361 (5cr)

Psychology

1 semester

PSYC 100 (3cr); PSYC 230 (3cr)

*CHEM 115 requires a strong background in high school math and chemistry

Recommended Other Courses

Biol 323 Genetics and Biol 324 Lab

Nrsg 220 Medical Terminology

Biol 305 Molecular and Cell Biology

Psyc 251 Abnormal Psyc

Other 300 level Biol courses

Phil 306 Ethics of Healthcare

Courses in languages and communications

Graduate Record Exam (GRE): This standardized exam is required for admission to some PA schools. The exam consists of 3 sections, Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning and Analytical Writing. It is often taken in the spring semester or summer following the junior year. Go to: http://www.ets.org/gre for more information on the GRE.

Non-Academic Considerations: Applicants must obtain experience in healthcare. Depending on the school to which you are applying, some programs require 500-3,000+ hours of healthcare experience. Some strictly require a certain number of hours, while other programs only recommend a number. Seek out health-related experiences, job shadowing and volunteering opportunities early! Examples of jobs – CNA, EMT, Phlebotomist.

 

Suggested Pre-PA Curriculum: The following program is suggested for a student in any major. It is important that students work with a pre-PA advisor each semester.

Freshman year – Fall

MATH

CHEM 105 + 106 or 115*

BIOL 221

PSYC 100

Freshman year – Spring

MATH

BIOL 222

BIOL 223

CHEM 109 or 115*

Sophomore year – Fall

BIOL 214

CHEM 325

MATH 246

LE & Major courses

Sophomore year – Spring

BIOL 314

Upper level BIOL

LE & Major courses

Junior year – Fall

BIOL 361

LE & Major courses

(Prepare for GRE)

Junior year – Spring

CHEM 352

LE & Major courses

(Take GRE and apply to schools in summer)

Senior year – Fall

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

Senior year – Spring

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

*CHEM 115 requires a strong background in high school math and chemistry

** Beginning course in mathematics depends on UWEC Mathematics Placement Exam score

UWEC Pre-PA Advisors:

Dr. Julie Anderson (anderju@uwec.edu)

Dr. Dan Herman (hermandp@uwec.edu)

See a Life & Health Science Advisor in the Advising, Retention and Career Center

More Information:

More info here!

Printable Pre-Physician Assistant Advising sheet

 

 

 

 

Physical therapy is an allied health profession that focuses on the prevention and rehabilitation of various musculoskeletal injuries or problems. The ultimate goal of physical therapists is to facilitate the return of patients to pre-injury levels of functioning. Physical therapists are an integral part of any comprehensive health care team. They frequently work with other health care providers, such as physicians, occupational therapists, athletic trainers, nurses, dentists, psychologists, social workers, podiatrists, and speech pathologists and audiologists.  Pre-physical therapy is a program of study, not an academic major.  No specific academic major is required for pre-physical therapy. The majority of students will choose one of the following majors to complete their pre-physical therapy requirements:

  • Kinesiology comprehensive major with emphasis in Rehabilitation Science
  • Biology standard major

Although a large number of physical therapists work in hospitals, a majority can be found in private physical therapy offices, rehabilitation centers, community health centers, nursing homes, home health agencies, corporate or industrial health centers, sports facilities, research institutions, schools, pediatric centers, and universities.

Admission Requirements:

  • Bachelor's degree with any major from an accredited institution (required by most programs)
  • Completion of all prerequisite courses
  • Competitive overall and science GPAs (3.5 overall average for those accepted)
  • Competitive Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score (required for some programs)
  • Observational or work experience in physical therapy
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Completed application with Physical Therapy Centralized Application Service (PTCAS) (for most programs)
  • Face-to-face interview required by many programs

Required Pre-PT Courses: (Admission requirements and prerequisites may differ so it is important to check for specific requirements.)

Courses

Required Credits

Suggested UWEC Courses

Human Anatomy and Physiology

2 semesters

BIOL 214 & 314 (8cr)

General Biology

1-2 semesters

BIOL 221 (4cr)

Chemistry

2 semesters

CHEM 105 & CHEM 106 & CHEM 109 (8-9cr)

Physics

2 semesters

PHYS 211 & 212 (9cr)

Mathematics

Statistics

MATH 246 (4cr)

Med Terminology

1 semester

NRSG 220 (1cr)

Psychology

2-3 semesters

PSYC 100 (3cr); 230 (3cr); 251 (3cr)

Sociology

1 semester

SOC 101 (3cr)

Recommended Courses: The following courses are recommended by some physical therapy programs:

  • KINS 304 Biomechanics
  • KINS 308 Exercise Physiology
  • MATH 111 or 114 Calculus

Non-Academic Considerations: All physical therapy programs require observational or actual work experience in physical therapy prior to admission. Check the admissions requirements for each physical therapy program to determine the minimum number of hours and types of settings for observation.

Graduate Record Exam (GRE): This standardized exam is required for admission to most physical therapy programs. The exam consists of 3 sections, Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning and Analytical Writing. It is often taken in the spring semester or summer following the junior year. Go to: http://www.ets.org/gre for more information on the GRE

Suggested Pre-PT Curriculum: The following program is suggested for a student in any major.  It is important that students work with a pre-PT advisor each semester. This is one example of how the pre-PT courses can be arranged. Courses will not necessarily be taken in this order. The order of courses taken will depend on the student’s major.

Freshman year – Fall

MATH*

CHEM 105 + 106

LE & Major courses

Freshman year – Spring

PHYS 211

KINS 294

LE & Major courses

Sophomore year – Fall

BIOL 214

CHEM 109

PSYC 100

KINS 304

LE & Major courses

Sophomore year – Spring

BIOL 314

MATH 246

PHYS 212

PSYC 230

Additional science course

Junior year – Fall

PSYC 251

KINS 308

SOC 101

LE & Major courses

(Prepare for GRE)

Junior year – Spring

LE & Major courses

(Take GRE and apply to schools in summer)

Senior year – Fall

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

Senior year – Spring

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses

 

UWEC Pre-PT Advisors:

Ms. Michelle Mattes (mattesm@uwec.edu)

Dr. Saori Braun (braunsi@uwec.edu),

Dr. Marquell Johnson (johnmarq@uwec.edu)

Life & Health Science Advisors in the Advising, Retention and Career Center (ARCC)

More Information:

More info here

Printable Pre-Physical Therapy Advising sheet

Veterinary medicine deals with the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease, disorder, and injury in animals. The scope of veterinary medicine is wide, covering all animal species, both domesticated and wild. In the United States, there are 28 universities that award the advanced professional degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM or VMD). Although there is not a specific major for pre-veterinary students, most students choose one of the following majors:

  • Biology standard major with a minor in chemistry OR a minor in pre-professional health science
  • Biochemistry/Molecular Biology Comprehensive Major
  • Biology comprehensive major in Microbiology
  • Chemistry Comprehensive Major

Admission Requirements:

  • Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution (any major) (not required by some programs)
  • Completion of all prerequisite courses
  • Competitive cumulative and prerequisite GPAs (3.5-3.8 average for those accepted)
  • Competitive Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score (MCAT accepted by some programs)
  • Veterinarian shadowing hours (required by most programs)
  • Letters of recommendation (most programs require at least one from a veterinarian)
  • Completed application with Veterinary Medicine Centralized Application Service (VMCAS) (for most programs)
  • Face-to-face interview

Required Pre-Veterinary Medicine Courses: (Admission requirements and prerequisites may differ from school to school, so it is important to check with schools for specific requirements.)

Courses

Required Credits

UW Madison

Required Credits

University of MN

Suggested UWEC Courses

English

3-6

8

WRIT 116 (5cr) + an addl ENGL course

Mathematics

-

3

MATH 109 [+ MATH 112 or 113 & 114] to complete BS/Biol requirement (4+cr)

Inorganic chemistry

8

8

CHEM 105 & CHEM 106 & CHEM 109 (8-9cr) or CHEM 115* (6cr)

Organic chemistry

3

6

CHEM 325 & 326 (8cr)

Biochemistry

3

3

CHEM 352 (4cr) or CHEM 452 (3cr)

Physics

6

8-12

PHYS 211 & 212 (9cr) or PHYS 231 & 232 (10cr)

Biology

5

8-10

BIOL 221 & 222 & 223 (9cr)

Genetics

3

3

BIOL 323 (3cr) & BIOL 324 (2cr)

Microbiology (w/lab)

-

4

BIOL 361 (5cr)

Statistics

3-5

-

MATH 246 (4cr)

*CHEM 115 requires a strong background in high school math and chemistry

Recommended Courses: Many students find the following courses to be helpful in veterinary school courses:

Biol 306 Infectious Disease Ecology

Biol 402 Topics in Virology & Immunology   

Biol 317 Animal Physiology     

Business courses

Biol 354 Advanced Nutrition              

Economics courses

Biol 361 Biology of Microorganisms     

Graduate Record Exam (GRE): This standardized exam is required for admission to most veterinary schools. The exam consists of 3 sections, Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning and Analytical Writing. It is often taken in the spring semester or summer following the junior year. Go to: http://www.ets.org/gre for more information on the GRE.

Non-Academic Considerations: Applicants are required to obtain experience in the veterinary medical profession and in the care and handling of animals. This should include experience with both small animals and food-producing animals and is typically done through practicing veterinarians. Seek out animal care related experiences, job shadowing and volunteering opportunities early!

Suggested Pre-Veterinary Curriculum: The following program is suggested for a student with a biology major. It is important that students work with a pre-vet advisor each semester.

Freshman year – Fall

Biol 221

Chem 105+106 or 115 *

Math 109, 112, 113, or 114 **

LE course or Writing 116

Freshman year – Spring

Biol 222/223

Chem 109 or 115*

Math 112, 113, or 114**

Sophomore year – Fall

Biol 300-level

Chem 325

LE course or additional math

Writing 116 or LE

Sophomore year – Spring

Biol 300-level

Chem 326

LE course

LE course

Junior year – Fall

Biol 300- level

Biol 300-level

Physics 211

Junior year – Spring

Biol 300- level

Chem 352

Physics 212

LE course (Take GRE In Spring and complete VMCAS application in summer)

Senior year – Fall

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses #

(October 1st is the last opportunity to take GRE)

Senior year– Spring

Complete Major/Minor/LE

Additional recommended courses #

*CHEM 115 requires a strong background in high school math and chemistry

** Beginning course in mathematics depends on UWEC Mathematics Placement Exam score

 

UWEC Pre-Veterinary Advisors:

Dr. Julie Anderson (anderju@uwec.edu)

Dr. Sasha Showsh (showshsa@uwec.edu)

See a Life & Health Science Advisor in the Advising, Retention and Career Center

More Information:

UW Madison School of Veterinary Medicine             U of MN College of Veterinary Medicine                  

oaa@svm.vetmed.wisc.edu                                   dvminfo@umn.edu

www.vetmed.wisc.edu                                          www.cvm.umn.edu

For a complete list of veterinary programs www.aavmc.org

More info here

Printable Pre-Veterinary Advising sheet

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