2009 Workshops

"SPECTRA: Remote Experiments at the Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) for Your Classes."
Rick Cole, Evansville H.S. and Steven Sahyun, UW-Whitewater
Students Performing Experiments Collaboratively Through Remote Access (SPECTRA) is an exciting opportunity for students to have remote access to the Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) national laboratory and use synchrotron light as an experimental tool. The experiments encourage independent thinking and creativity that is critical in a research program and allow experimenters to experience the joys and challenges of scientific research. Applications at both High School and University levels will be demonstrated with a chance for real-time data acquisition.
Workshop is capped at 24 participants.
Time: 3 hr. Friday 2-5
Location: Upham 58

"Bungee Jumping of Action Figures"
Gary Baier, Green Bay East H.S.
Forces and motion of bungee jumping action figures are introduced to students in this fun lab. Bring your own action figure to test!
Time: Friday 3:30-4:30 pm Friday
Location: Room 141

"Using Comics to Promote Thinking"
Matt Evans, UWEC
Comics often times get the physics wrong, ... or right! We will look through examples and talk about how to get students to see physical principles in a new light.
Time: 4:30-5:30 pm Friday
Location: Room 141

"Astronomy Activities Using CLEA"
Juliana Constantinescu, UW-Whitewater
An exploration of several in-class or laboratory activities using the free Contemporary Laboratory Experiences in Astronomy (CLEA) software. These interactive laboratory exercises illustrate several modern astronomical techniques using digital data and color images. They are suitable for both high-school and college classes at all levels.
Workshop is capped at 24 participants.
Time: 8:00-9:15am Saturday
Location: Upham 50

"Mapping the Milky Way Galaxy"
Bob Benjamin, UW-Whitewater
In this workshop, participants will learn what makes up the Milky Way Galaxy, some of the major features of the Galaxy (both confirmed and suspected), and be updated on the latest discoveries on what the Galaxy would look like as viewed from the outside. (Did you know about the new spiral arm discovered in the summer of 2008?) Participants will be given a "Mapping the Milky Way" packet designed for use with middle school and high school students with a knowledge of trigonometry and algebra. This activity outlines the four principal ways that astronomers determine the distance to objects in the Galaxy, and each participant will be given several objects to put onto a "map" of the Galaxy designed by a NASA artist. Design of this activity has been supported by the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium.
Workshop is capped at 24 participants.
Time: 3 hr. Saturday 8-11
Location: Upham 166

"Share Group and Make-and-Take"
Any participants, High Schools and Colleges across Wisconsin
Come share, discuss and show us how to make your favorite classroom activity. This participant driven "workshop" will bring together YOUR best ideas. If you have questions or suggestions please contact Matt Evans (evansmm@uwec.edu) prior to the meeting.
Time: 9:30-11:30 am Saturday
Location: Room 141

 

 

 

 

 

 

The workshops listed below have been offered in previous years
(and will hopefully give you ideas on a workshop you might offer at this years meeting)

NEW TEACHER WORKSHOP!! Sponsored bt the AAPT
Judy Schmidt Oak Creek HS (retired) and Gary Baier from Green Bay East High School
This 2-day workshop will be held Friday afternoon and Saturday morning. Friday will focus on dynamics (motion velocity and acceleration with graphing) and Saturday Newton's laws and momentum will be studied, applying material from Fridays session.
W1: Friday 1:30-5pm and Saturday 8:30-noon

Inexpensive Laboratory Exercises in Thermodynamics, Electricity & Magnetism, Modern Physics
J. Patrick Polley from Beloit College
W2: Friday 1-5pm

Labs and Demos
Led by Melissa Vigil from Marquette University
This workshop is a sharing session for all those who have particularly illuminating demonstrations or experiments using low-cost apparatus.  Bring a sample of your apparatus and a set of parts-lists and procedures to share. Participants welcomed! Sign up to help us plan ahead!
W3: Friday 1:30-3pm

Ripon College Physics Fun Force: Making Science Fun!
Joshua LeGreve and Joshua Frey, students at Ripon College
The Ripon College Physics Fun Force is a community outreach group led and staffed by physics and education students. The group visits elementary schools with hands-on science lessons that also include an interactive reading of a children's book. Come learn how to involve service learning in the high school/college classroom as well as pick up tips for getting elementary students (and teachers) excited about science. Focus is paid on the teaching of investigation strategies and the scientific method by high school/college students to students in grades K through 5. Hands-on activities, handouts, and booklists will be shared!
W4: Friday 3:45-5:15pm

Make Your Students Think Like Scientists - Five Astronomy-Based Activities
Lyle Ford from UW - Eau Claire Physics & Astronomy
Laboratory activites are often focused on the data collection process. While this is important, it often leaves little time for deep analysis. In this workshop, five activities will be described that emphasize the interprative part of science. While the activities are all based on examples from astronomy, the methods can be easily extended to other areas of physics. Participants will receive a CD containing the labs and supporting documents. (High School and College level)
W5: Saturday 8-10am

Amusement Park Physics
Paul Nevins, and Nick Gagnon, from Chippewa Falls HS and Gary Baier from Green Bay East High School
W6: Saturday 11am-12 noon

 

 

 

 

CLEA Workshop,
Project CLEA -- CONTEMPORARY LABORATORY EXPERIENCES IN ASTRONOMY -- develops laboratory exercises that illustrate modern astronomical techniques using digital data and color images. They are suitable for high- school and college classes at all levels.  Each CLEA laboratory exercise includes a dedicated computer program, a student manual, and a technical guide for the instructor. The technical guides describe file formats, user-settable options, and algorithms used in the programs.
For more info, visit: http://www3.gettysburg.edu/~marschal/clea/CLEAhome.html

Macro/Micro Physics: The Large, The Small, The Fast, The Slow and the NANO,
Larry Scheckel Tomah High School and Bob Friedel CENCO Physics and Sargent Welch
From a cordless Hovercraft to Quantum Particles in a Box, come and see, explore and utlize the latest physics and physical science innovations provided by CENCO Physics and Sargent Welch. Handouts, lesson plans and product descriptions will be provided. "Door Prizes" will be extensive.

Labs and Demos for $25 or Less
This workshop is a sharing session for all those who have particularly illuminating demonstrations or experiments using low-cost apparatus.  Bring a sample of your apparatus and a set of parts-lists and procedures to share.  All submissions will be on display on Friday and Saturday for folk to see and try.  This session will be followed upby a group shopping trip to American Science & Surplus on Saturday afternoon after the business meeting.  Participants welcomed!

Amusement Park Physics Friday 3:30-4:30 pm Gary Baier and Niel Walker from Green Bay East High School
An 8 hour lab at the amusement park may be the best physics day of your studnets' lives. This workshop will provide the basic information on how to prepare your students for the amusement park and how to analize the data. Each person will leave with a packet of material for use in the classroom and amusement park.

PASCO WORKSHOP – BRINGING PHYSICS TO LIFE Saturday 8:30-10:30 am
Find out how probeware can increase student understanding of complex physics concepts including Newton’s Third Law, the Law of Conservation of Energy, Kinematics and Voltage/Current relationships. Using sensors, software and dataloggers, you’ll see for yourself how students’ grasp of physics concepts can be improved in a way not easily accomplished using more traditional methods. (Feel free to come for only the first or second hour, or both!)

Middle School Science Round Table Saturday 8:30-9:30 am
This workshop is run by middle school science teachers for middle school science teachers.  Leading the session is a nationally recognized teacher who is a product of Milwaukee schools.  Please come and share struggles, successes, and best lesson plans. Participants welcomed!

Medieval Astronomical Instruments Make & Take Saturday 9:30-10:30 am
Many teachers look for ways to develop interdisciplinary assignments for their students.  In this workshop, Participants will learn about basic scientific instruments of the period, with a focus on astrolabes and tools for timekeeping; discover how to measure short intervals of time without the "second hand" of mechanical clocks, and obtain web resources for all of this and the materials for making working paper models of some of the instruments discussed.


Pasco Physics Workshop
Tom Kuhn, Pasco Scientific
Intended Audience: College/University/High School teachers
Cost: FREE
Abstract: Come and do some hands-on experiments using technology in the physics lab. Experiments that are set up include: Hooke's Law, Waves on String, Centripetal Acceleration, Measurement of g, Conservation of Momentum, Newton's 3rd Law of Motion, Inverse Square Law of Light, and Time of Flight.


Using Scroll Bars to "Soup-Up" your Excel Spreadsheet
David Tamres, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
Intended Audience: College/University/High School teachers with some experience using Excel
Cost: $7.00
Abstract: By attaching a scroll bar (slider) to an Excel spreadsheet, you can change a quantity with a simple drag of the mouse, and, in real time, watch the response of a graph that uses this quantity. You can also animate graphs by using a scroll bar to control time. This is a mini-version of a workshop presented by Prof. Michael Moloney (Department of Physics and Optical Engineering, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology) at last summer’s AAPT meeting in Madison, WI. It is presented here with Prof. Moloney’s kind permission.


Density Currents and Sound Propagation in the Ocean
Gary Baier, Green Bay East High School
Intended Audience: High School teachers
Cost: $7.00
Abstract: Salinity’s relationship to deep ocean currents and sound are presented at a high school level. This workshop is from the Maury Project sponsored by the American Meteorological Society and the U.S. Naval Academy. Topics are taught through hands-on activities with each participant taking a prepared lesson outline with them.


Pasco Physics Workshop
Tom Kuhn, Pasco Scientific
Intended Audience: College/University/High School teachers
Cost: FREE
Abstract: Come and do some hands-on experiments using technology in the physics lab. Experiments that are set up include: Hooke's Law, Waves on String, Centripetal Acceleration, Measurement of g, Conservation of Momentum, Newton's 3rd Law of Motion, Inverse Square Law of Light, and Time of Flight.


Trig or Treat! - Cast a Spell with Lab Practicals”, Michael Lyman, Betsy Barnard, Eric Gettrust, and Dominic Johann-Berkel, Madison
West High School
Intended Audience: High School teachers
Place: Rm. 217 Cowley Hall
Cost: $7.00
Abstract: If student learning is your ghoul, lab practicals are cool. There'll be thrills and chills for skills (a little competition and lots of assessment). No bones about it, you'll have a scream.


Making Simple Holograms
Greg Taft, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
Intended Audience: College/University/High School teachers
Cost: $15.00
Abstract: Participants will learn a simple technique to make reflection holograms. Slides, laser, and processing chemicals will be provided so that each participant can make their own hologram during the workshop.


Thought Experiments in Physics Education
Mark Lattery, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh
Intended Audience: College/University/High School Physics/Astronomy Teachers
Cost: $12.00
Abstract: The history of science and philosophy is filled with great thought experiments (gedankenexperimente). Examples include Galileo's hole-in-the-Earth, Newton's rotating bucket experiment, and Schrodinger's cat. Over the past several centuries, thought experiments have had a profound affect on the direction of science. However, implications for teaching are generally neglected. Attend this workshop to learn how thought experiments can be used to gain your student's attention, colorize dull classroom discussions, and enliven hands-on activities. More importantly, learn how the skill of thought experimentation can be developed and used by your students! Workshop participants will sketch out a few simple lessons using the bridging-analogies model and receive peer feedback. Related issues in student learning and assessment will be discussed.


Role of Physlets in Teaching Physics
John Torgerson, AAPT/PTRA
Intended Audience: High School Physics or Physical Science Teachers
Cost: $25.00
Abstract: Physlets (Physics applets) are single-concept, interactive, computer programs that help students understand physics principles. All are graphical and may be used as demonstrations, sources of problems, or interactive explorations. Participants in this workshop will explore several Physlets hands-on, and will receive the Physlets text and CD.


Civic Engagement in the Physics Curriculum
Theo Koupelis, University of Wisconsin-Marathon
Intended Audience: College/University/High School teachers interested in collaborative efforts
Cost: $7.00
Abstract: This workshop is aimed at those interested in improving physics education within the context of civic engagement. We will describe a relevant national program and engage in group activities that will provide a springboard for making curricular changes that will make civic engagement an integral part of the physics curriculum.


High Energy Astronomy in the Classroom

Robert Sparks, The Prairie School/NASA Swift Educator Ambassador
Intended Audience: High School Physics/Astronomy Teachers
Cost: $7.00
Abstract: NASA will be launching two notable missions to study the upper end of the electromagnetic spectrum: SWIFT and GLAST. I will present a series of classroom tested, standards based lessons revolving around gamma ray bursts and active galaxies. The activities use inexpensive materials and can be adapted to courses ranging from middle school Earth Science to high school physics.


Thought Experiments and Bridging Analogies in Physics Teaching

Friday morning, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 a.m Phillips Hall 208.
Mark Lattery University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh
E-mail: lattery@uwosh.edu
Enrollment limit: 24 participants.
Workshop fee: $21.00
Abstract: The history of science and philosophy is filled with great thought experiments (gedanken experimente). Over the past several centuries, thought experiments have had a profound effect on the direction of science. However, implications for teaching are generally neglected. Attend this workshop to learn how thought experiments can be used to gain your student's attention, colorize dull classroom discussions, and enliven hands-on activities. More importantly, learn how the skill of thought experimentation can be developed and used by your students! Workshop participants will sketch out a few simple lessons using the bridging-analogies model and receive peer feedback. Related issues in student learning and assessment will be discussed. Attended this workshop before? This workshop includes many new examples!


SHOW and TELL: Physics Under Pressure
Erik Hendrickson, Doug Dunham - UW-Eau Claire
E-mail: hendrije@uwec.edu; dunhamdj@uwec.edu
Workshop fee: $15.00
Abstract: Presenters will demonstrate a wide variety of pressure demonstrations (from potatoes to vacuum pumps), provide handouts explaining some of the underlying physics and descriptions/costs of construction/materials, and assist participants in playing with the demos. Questions about how and where these demos fit into your curriculum and/or the state science standards will be entertained.


Using Interfaces and Sensors to do Science in the Physics Laboratory
Tom Kuhn PASCO Midwest Educational Representative
E-mail: kuhn@pasco.com
Level: Appropriate curriculum for high school and college physics teachers.
Workshop fee: None. (Compliments of PASCO.)
(**Workshop is a "work at your own pace" workshop and takes about 2.5 hours to complete. Thus you may be able to attend some of the afternoon talks)
Abstract: PASCO will hold a hands-on workshop that allows teachers to do experiments in Mechanics, Optics, E&M and Waves using interfaces and sensors. There will be a drawing for a 750 interface at the conclusion of the workshop for those who register. Stations will be set up where attendees can do the following experiments (extended hours will allow you to step away to see talks if you wish):


Holography for beginners
Jin Huang, (UW-Eau Claire)
E-mail: huangj@uwec.edu
Workshop fee: $20.00
Abstract: : This workshop represents a brief introduction of holography for beginners, including the reflected and transmission holograms. Participants will make their own reflected holograms during the workshop. Bring some small personal things (figures, ring,...) as your objects to make your own holograms, (the film size will be 2"x 2")


CLEA: Free software that simulates real astronomy
Lauren Likkel (University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire)
Email: likkel@uwec.edu
Workshop fee: $7.00
Abstract: Your students become observational astronomers with these programs, learning how to obtain data and analyze it. Examples: Find the distance to a star cluster by doing photometry to make an H-R diagram; use spectroscopy of galaxies to find the Hubble constant. Try out the programs and see if they will work for what you want your students to learn.


Graph Straightening in the Classroom / Introduction to Graphical Analysis
David Groth - Parker High School - Janesville, WI
E-mail: dgroth@janesville.k12.wi.us
Workshop Fee: $10.00
Abstract: This session will serve as a crash course in linking data collection to the development of mathematical equations. Graphical Analysis software is used to graph and straighten data such that slope and intercept values can be obtained. A student centered classroom style will be emphasized. Extras within the workshop will include discussions of extensions to labs as well as remote data collection techniques using Logger Pro and Vernier data vests.


Density and Sound Waves in Water
Gary Baier
Green Bay East High School
The density of any body of water depends on temperature and salinity (in the case of the ocean.) This density in turn affects the speed and refraction of sound. In this workshop, participants conduct simple experiments students enjoy because they are based on real data from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Each participant will receive a free project book for use at their school.


Developing a Model for the Formation of Real Images
Edward Wyrembeck (Howards Grove High School)
Jeff Elmer (Oshkosh North High School)
This workshop is designed to help teachers develop a 3-dimensional geometric model for the formation of real images. It will explore how a converging lens forms a real image in free space and the actual purpose of a screen. Participants will also learn how to make and deploy an inexpensive light cone model made out of spaghetti noodles and an athletic cone. Instructors will employ an active inquiry-based method of teaching called the “modeling method of physics instruction” (developed at Arizona State University).


Simple Physics Experiments

Tom Kuhn
PASCO Scientific
We will measure period of simple pendulum and find the acceleration due to gravity (g) indirectly. Then, we will go outside to measure initial speed of air rocket and see how well energy is conserved. Finally, we will carry out several energy conversion experiments.


Modeling Physical Science- You Have to Experience It To Believe In It! (Part I)

Jim Schmitt (Eau Claire North High School)
Pat Westphal (Neenah High School, retired)
In 2001, the Modeling Method of Physics Instruction (Arizona State University) was recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as one of two exemplary programs in K-12 Science Education. This method places an emphasis on student construction of models through the use of data collection, graphical analysis, and group presentation. In this workshop, participants will experience the Modeling Method as their students would. Participants will receive a copy of all materials. For more information about the Modeling Method, see http://modeling.asu.edu/. All participants will receive a constant speed buggy!


Quantifying Lab Results using Linear Regression Techniques

Curt Dumermuth
Ellsworth High School
Physics-the science that doesn't work! Learn how to incorporate linear regression techniques to determine meaningful numbers to check the accuracy of your labs. Activities will employ both simple paper-and-pencil graphing and graphing calculators. Learn a new approach to convey an appreciation for how scientific discovery really happens!


Using Scroll Bars to "Soup-Up" your Excel Spreadsheet
David Tamres
University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
By attaching a scroll bar (slider) to an Excel spreadsheet, you can change a quantity with a simple drag of the mouse, and, in real time, watch the response of a graph that uses this quantity. You can also animate graphs by using a scroll bar to control time. This is a mini-version of a workshop presented by Professor Michael Moloney (Department of Physics and Optical Engineering, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology) at the Summer 2003 AAPT meeting in Madison. Workshop materials are presented with Professor Moloney’s kind permission.


Trig or Treat! Cast a Spell with Lab Practicals and Video Capture Technology
Michael Lyman, Betsy Barnard, Eric Gettrust, Dominic Johann-Berkel
Madison West High School (sponsored by Vernier Software and Technology)
If student learning is your ghoul, lab practicals are for you! Capture the excitement using Vernier’s Video Capture technology.


Stellar Photometry in the Classroom
Nadia Kaltcheva and Harry Leckenby
University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
Stellar photometry is the art of measuring the brightness of an astronomical object and one of the fundamental techniques of the observational astronomy. Instruments include the human eye, phototubes and solid-state detectors. The apparent brightness of any given star as seen from Earth depends on different factors: the intrinsic brightness of the star, the distance of the star from Earth, the amount of interstellar absorbing material located between the star and the Earth. These relationships will be investigated with an artificial star in the lab.


Nuclear Radiation for Physics Teachers

Duane Hall, Kimberly Knight-Wiegert, Mike Lewandowski, Marc Martz, Dan Miron
North Central Chapter of the Health Physics Society
An interactive workshop with information, techniques, and tools to teach basic nuclear radiation topics. Participants review radiation and detection, radiation in the environment, industry, nuclear power, and food safety, health effects, radiation safety, and hands-on laboratory exercises. Workshop materials are aligned to the Grade 12 benchmark of the Wisconsin Model Academic Standards. See http://www.hps1.org/chapters/ncc/. All participants will receive a radiation detector.


Grading Homework by Computer (WebAssign)

Ken Menningen and David Tamres
University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
Online grading services deliver, collect, and grade homework, providing instant feedback to students on their performance. Instructors can permit re-submission of answers, thereby encouraging students to revisit the more challenging problems and to correct their mistakes. Depending on the service used, instructors may select homework problems from a textbook or may create their own, even randomizing the numerical values featured in the problem. Other possibilities include giving partial credit, rewarding early submission, and assigning linear regression or image map questions. This workshop will use WebAssign, an online grading service used nationwide by hundreds of colleges and high schools, and will start you on the road to becoming an expert user of this service. (For more information about WebAssign, visit http://www.webassign.net/)

 

For more information please contact the WAPT meeting coordinator vicepresident@wapt.org
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