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Pit 6

501A Finchford Loamy Sand

Ap horizon - 0 to10 cm; very dark grayish brown (10YR 3/2); subrounded, medium sand; weak, coarse, subangular blocks; very friable, slightly sticky, non-plastic consistence; no acid reaction; slightly acidic; common, fine, horizontal roots; few, 0.5 to 2 cm, subangular, no orientation clasts; abrupt, smooth boundary.

A horizon - 10 to 20 cm; dark brown (10YR 3/3); subrounded, coarse sand; weak, medium, subangular blocks; very friable, slightly sticky, non-plastic consistence; no acid reaction; slightly acidic; no roots; few, 0.7 to 3.5 cm, subangular, no orientation clasts; abrupt, smooth boundary.

AB horizon - 20 to 50 cm; dark yellowish brown (10YR 3/6); subrounded, medium sand; weak, medium, subangular blocks; very friable, slightly sticky, non-plastic consistence; no acid reaction; slightly acidic; no roots; common, 1.6 to 2 cm, subrounded, horizontal orientation clasts; clear, smooth boundary.

B horizon - 50+ cm; dark yellowish brown (10YR 4/6); subangular, coarse sand; weak, medium, subangular blocks; very friable, non-sticky, non-plastic consistence; no acid reaction; slightly acidic; no roots; many, 1.1 to 5.5 cm, subrounded, horizontal orientation clasts; abrupt, smooth boundary.

 

 

Pit 6 Soil Profile

View of Pit 6 Soil Profile

 

Summary

Pit 6 is located in an old corn field that is part of the Chippewa River terrace.  The Hubbard site is approximately 137.16 meters south of the road.  Soils in this location are classified in the Finchford Series as a 501A Finchford loamy sand, 0 to 3 percent slopes in the new Pepin County Soil Survey, and in the Hubbard Series as a Hubbard loamy fine sand (HmA) in the old Pepin County Soil Survey.  Our observations generally fit these descriptions.  However there are a few discrepancies.  In the A, AB, and B horizons, we have no roots when the Soil Survey states that very fine and fine roots occur.  The boundary of our B horizon is abrupt and smooth when the Soil Survey says it is gradual and wavy.  Similarities between the soil characteristics we observed and the Soil Survey include: horizonation, texture (loamy sand), structure (subangular blocks), drainage class (excessively drained), parent material (sandy gravely outwash), slope (0 to 3 percent), and soil colors.

Contributed by Group 6: Sarah Buss, Travis Franz, Breck Johnson, and Paul Kruschke

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