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Tip Sheet for the week of Sept. 27, 2010

RELEASED: Sept. 27, 2010

Story Idea
UW-Eau Claire geography students and students in a North High School honors earth science class are working together this semester to study how soils form, change over time and what soils can tell us about proper land use practices. During the project, students will work at Northstar Middle School and in UW-Eau Claire's soils lab. The high school freshmen and college students will share their findings during UW-Eau Claire's Student Research Day in the spring. The findings also will be shared via research posters at North High School and Northstar Middle School. The college students are enrolled in the "Soils in the Environment" course, taught by Dr. Garry Running, professor of geography and anthropology. Students in high school science classes seldom do active research because their ability to conduct field research is limited. They often cannot travel to study sites, research takes too much time away from school and costs can be high. In this project, high school students are meeting outside of their regular school day to do the research. North teacher Adam Keeton hopes the experience will help his students become better science‐minded thinkers and prepare them to do research at the university level. Students will continue their field work the next three Mondays (Sept. 27, Oct. 4 and Oct. 11) on the grounds at Northstar Middle School. University students will work from 2:20-5:30 p.m.; the high school students will arrive at the site at 3 p.m. (The work site is in the Northstar woods, uphill from the parking lot. Walk past the Frisbee golf area to the dirt trail leading into the woods. The students will be working halfway up the hill on the right.) For details, contact Dr. Garry Running at UW-Eau Claire at 7158362731 or Adam Keeton at North High School at7158526709.

Story/Photo Idea
Roy Staab, called the "Johnny Appleseed of environmental art" by The New York Times, is on campus to work with students on an outdoor art installation. His visit precedes an exhibit documenting 31 years of his environmental artwork. The "Four Seasons/Four Corners" will be displayed Oct. 7-28 in the Foster Art Gallery of the Haas Fine Arts Center. The exhibit features four works from the four corners of Wisconsin throughout the four seasons of the year. Staab's work is often located on or near water, using natural materials such as reeds, and incorporates the reflection on the water as part of the work. The sculpture at UW-Eau Claire will be installed along the Chippewa River under the north side of the footbridge. Sculpture students will participate in the project and create site-specific projects of their own, to be judged by Staab, after a semester course on the historical and cultural roots of site-specific sculpture. Staab's works have been installed in France, Italy, Japan, Canada, Costa Rica and the United States. For details, contact Jason Lanka, assistant professor of art & design, at lankaja@uwec.edu.

Story Idea
UW-Eau Claire has attracted a record 215 international students this year. That number represents a 26 percent increase over last year's number of international students and includes students from countries such as Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Yemen that haven't been represented among the student population for a long time. For details, contact Dr. Karl Markgraf, director of the Center for International Education, at 715-836-4411 or Markgraf@uwec.edu.

Story Idea
Dr. Eric Jamelske, associate professor of economics, will present "What do students and local households think about global warming?" from noon-1 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 29, at Sweetwaters Restaurant in Eau Claire. He will discuss the results of a survey he and five students conducted. In the survey, 292 households and 412 students submitted surveys. More than 50 percent of both groups thought global warming was happening and that it was cause for major concern, but more students than households responded this way. More household respondents said it was not really cause for concern, and more household respondents said global warming was not happening. Two of the student researchers — Isaac Borofka-Webb and Ben Ponkratz — are from the Chippewa Valley. For details about the project and findings, contact Dr. Eric Jamelske at 715-836-3254 or jamelsem@uwec.edu.

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