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Tip Sheet for the week of Oct. 11, 2010

RELEASED: October 11, 2010

Campus Expert
Dr. Paul Wagner, professor of computer science, will give a presentation this month titled "Computer Security and Cyberwarfare." He will address issues such as the definition of cyberwarfare, its impact and relation to traditional warfare, and the technological and political issues surrounding it. Wagner says cyberwarfare is an important issue because it's more likely that people living in the United States will be affected by cyberwarfare than by physical warfare. Cyber security experts recently said the cyber worm Stuxnet may be the world's first known cyber super weapon designed specifically to destroy a real-world target. Stuxnet has been the object of intense study since it was detected in June. Wagner's "Ask a Scientist" presentation will begin at 7 p.m. Oct. 26 at the Acoustic Café in downtown Eau Claire. Wagner is available to talk with the media about his research in the area of computer security. You can contact him at 715-836-5901 or wagnerpj@uwec.edu.

Story Idea
Five biology students — several from western Wisconsin — and a faculty member spent the summer researching the impact of chemical use in Cambodian rice paddies. The students are Brian Pauley, Eau Claire; Kathryn Prince, Junction City; Christopher Maierhofer, Eau Claire; Katrina Jacobs, Blue Mounds; and Andrew Ludvik, Weyerhaeuser. Deborah Freund, associate lecturer of biology, led the research team. Their research focused on the food webs in the paddies. Cambodian farmers eat many animals that live in the paddies, using frogs, toads, fish, clams and insects as a major source of dietary protein. Chemicals can disrupt the food chain and damage the ecosystem. Cambodia, which traditionally used organic methods for fertilizing rice and controlling insects, is using more chemicals in rice production to meet higher demand. Researchers took samples of fish, amphibians and insects from paddies using traditional or organic methods, those with manmade chemical fertilizers and those with pesticides. They're now assessing the samples they brought back from Cambodia. They'll present their findings Nov. 18 on campus. Ludvik, Maierhofer and Prince already are planning a return trip to Cambodia to continue their research. More information about the research can be found on the group's blog.

Story Idea
UW-Eau Claire's celebration of National Coming Out Day — "Out With It!" — will take place Monday, Oct. 11, with music, stories and conversations from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the Central Campus Mall. National Coming Out Day is a civil awareness day for coming out and discussion about gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender issues.

Story/Photo Idea
The Environmental Adventure Center will host a Native American history paddle on the Chippewa and Red Cedar rivers beginning at 11 a.m. Friday, Oct. 15. The canoe trip includes an 8-mile paddle down both rivers starting at the County Highway Y bridge in Dunnville and ending at Round Hill on the lower Chippewa River near Durand. Sophomore Robert Bell, an American Indian studies and history major from Chippewa Falls, will present his research on local river systems and the war between the Ojibwe and Dakota tribes during the 18th and 19th centuries. For details, contact Dan Langlois, EAC, at 715-836-3616 or Dr. Wendy Geniusz, American Indian studies, at 715-836-6045.

Story/Photo Idea
On Saturday, Oct. 16, an entertainment showcase featuring comedians Chad Taylor and Tracey Ashley will highlight UW-Eau Claire's Parents Weekend. The show will begin at 8 p.m. in Zorn Arena.

Photo Idea
UW-Eau Claire's "Dig Pink!" volleyball game will begin at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 15, in the McPhee Center on upper campus. The Blugolds will play UW-Oshkosh.

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