Back to:
Current year's news releases

All news releases
News and information home

Long-time Diplomatic Correspondent Mark Matthews to Discuss Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

RELEASED: Oct. 16, 2007

Mark Matthews
Mark Matthews

EAU CLAIRE — Mark Matthews, former diplomatic correspondent for the Baltimore Sun, will discuss "The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Is There Hope?" at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 5, in Room 100 of Hibbard Humanities Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. The one-hour presentation will be followed by a 30-minute question and answer session.

Matthews covered the Middle East for 15 years and served as Middle East correspondent based in Jerusalem for close to three years. He covered such major landmarks as the Madrid conference of 1991, the Yitzhak Rabin-Yasser Arafat handshake at the White House in 1993, the aftermath of Rabin's assassination and the Intifada of 2000. Matthews interviewed a broad range of people on all sides, including Israeli and Palestinian Authority officials at various levels, settlers, refugees, students, protesters and political prisoners,

Covering the Arab-Israeli conflict and Middle East diplomacy absorbed much of Matthew's professional life for many years. On a personal level, he reported feeling frustrated and bewildered by the continuing failure of the various sides to reach agreement, despite public opinion polls showing that the majority on both sides favored a two-state solution. His own drive to understand led to his book "The Lost Years: Bush, Sharon and Failure in the Middle East," published in September 2007 (Nation Books, a division of Basic Books).

According to Dr. Helaine Minkus, associate professor of geography and anthropology, Matthews is very knowledgeable about Middle East diplomacy in general and specifically the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. He claims to have made every effort to be even-handed in his approach, seeking to interact with a broad range of people representing the many different factions on both sides. He has stated that although he is aware of the repeated failure of so many diplomatic efforts and the continuing pain suffered by so many individuals, he retains hope that a region of such vitality and promise will in time progress beyond the current deadlock. He regards active American influence as necessary to an eventual resolution, an influence that he contends has not been consistently exerted during the Bush administration.

Support for the lecture has been provided by the UW-Eau Claire Academic Affairs Professional Development Program, the College of Arts and Sciences and the departments of geography and anthropology, history, and communication and journalism.

For additional information, contact Minkus, at 715-836-5481.

-30-

HM/NW

Back to:
Current year's news releases

All news releases
News and information home

 

Excellence. Our Measure. Our Motto. Our Goal.