Back to:
Current year's news releases

All news releases
News and information home

Tip Sheet for the Week of Nov. 7, 2005

RELEASED: Nov. 7, 2005

Story Idea
Marty Wood, chair of UW-Eau Claire's English department, is available to talk about the quality of writing among students today.
Wood believes that e-mail and other technology have helped improve some aspects of students' writing ability because they now write more often than they did in the past. Wood also is involved in efforts to enhance the quality of writing among students in all majors. He can talk about the emphasis that is placed on writing at UW-Eau Claire. If you want to talk with Wood about these and related issues, contact him at (715) 836-2639 or mwood@uwec.edu.

Story Idea
The former head of the U.S. Forest Service will be on campus this week to share his thoughts about conservation challenges facing the nation and the role that natural resources play in national security.
Mike Dombeck will speak at 3 p.m. Nov. 9 in Room 007 of Phillips Hall. His talk is titled "Conservation Challenges for the 21st Century." He'll give a second presentation, titled "National Security: What's Missing is Securing the Long Term Health of the Land," at 4:30 p.m. Nov. 9 in Room 100 of Hibbard Hall. For details, contact Lisa Theo at (715) 836-2316 or theolj@uwec.edu.

Story/Photo Idea
A UW-Eau Claire chemistry graduate who recently won a prestigious Lindbergh Foundation grant award will talk with students during a Nov. 10 visit to campus.
Dr. Franco Basile, a 1986 graduate, is an assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Wyoming. His talk will begin at 12:10 p.m. Nov. 10 in Room 401of Phillips Hall. (Photo Idea: Prior to the presentation, Basile will join chemistry students for lunch.) Basile received a Lindbergh grant for his project titled "Rapidly Detecting Bacterial Pathogens in Drinking and Waste Water to Prevent Contaminated Water from Being Released for Human Consumption." Quality drinking water is essential for the protection of human health and the environment. Currently, water treatment facilities use petri dish tests — a process that takes 24-48 hours — to detect E.coli, coliform and other harmful bacteria in drinking and waste water. Basile developed a method that detects and counts the amount of E.coli and coliform in drinking water and wastewater in as little as 30 minutes. Detecting contaminants quickly allows corrective measures to take place before dangerous levels of bacteria are reached. The method also detects low numbers of bacteria so measures can be put in place to stop distribution of contaminated water to humans. The method has the potential to be used in medical applications and the detection of biological warfare agents for homeland security. Lindbergh grants are made in amounts up to $10,580, which is the cost of building Charles Lindbergh's plane, the Spirit of St. Louis, in 1927. The Lindbergh Foundation is a non-profit organization based in Minnesota that strives to improve the quality of life by balancing technological innovation and the preservation of the environment.

Photo Idea
The Hmong New Year Celebration
will run from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 12 in the Olson addition of McPhee Center on upper campus. The celebration of culture and community offers traditional food, song, dances and entertainment.

Back to:
Current year's news releases

All news releases
News and information home

 

Excellence. Our Measure. Our Motto. Our Goal.