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UW-Eau Claire Students to Display Research
at Wisconsin Capitol

RELEASED: March 24, 2005

Posters in the Rotunda logoEAU CLAIRE — Several University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire undergraduate students will display their research April 7 in Wisconsin's Capitol in Madison.

"Posters in the Rotunda: A Celebration of Undergraduate Research" is sponsored by the UW System. Student research posters will be on display from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. in the State Capitol Rotunda on the first floor of the Capitol. There will be a short program at noon in the rotunda.

As the UW System's designated Center of Excellence for Faculty and Undergraduate Research Collaborations, UW-Eau Claire students and faculty regularly work together to complete nationally recognized, cutting-edge research in a variety of disciplines. Students across campus have research opportunities often found only at large graduate research institutions.

U.S. News and World Report's " America's Best Colleges 2005" lists UW-Eau Claire's undergraduate research program as one of the best in the nation. UW-Eau Claire is one of 46 universities — private and public — of all sizes from throughout the country to be included in the magazine's "Undergraduate Research/Creative Projects" category.

In Madison, UW-Eau Claire students and faculty mentors will join researchers from other System schools to discuss their work and the value of undergraduate research.

For more information about the event, contact Chris Lind, assistant vice chancellor for research, at (715) 836-3405 or lindct@uwec.edu.

The following students and projects will be part of the April 7 Madison exhibit:

  • Krista Bowman, Roberts, (research with Katie Ley, Tomahawk; and Kristina Hall, White Bear Lake, Minn.), with faculty mentor William Frankenberger, professor of psychology and director of the Human Development Center Child and Adolescent Research Institute. Research title: Psychiatric Diagnoses and Concomitant Drug Treatment in Specialized Child Populations. Abstract: The study determined the number of psychiatric diagnoses of children enrolled in Early Childhood Special Education Programs, specific medication(s) prescribed, number of children receiving multiple medications, possible adverse drug interactions for children receiving multiple medications, and attitudes of teachers regarding psychiatric medication use of children enrolled in the programs.
  • Sara E. Halada, Sturgeon Bay, with faculty mentor Kristine Retherford, professor of communication disorders, Research title: Language Sample Analysis: A Comparison of Two Procedures. Abstract: This study investigated the effectiveness of two language sample analysis procedures for determining if a child is evidencing language impairment. Bricker's (1993) Assessment, Evaluation, and Programming System for Infants and Children (AEPS) and Retherford's (2000) Structural Analysis were analyzed. Results and implications of the study will be discussed.
  • Katie Ley, Tomahawk, (research with Krista Bowman, Roberts), with faculty mentors William Frankenberger, professor of psychology and director of the Human Development Center Child and Adolescent Research Institute, and La Vonne J. Cornell-Swanson, assistant professor of social work. Research title: Use of Psychiatric Medications for Treatment of Elementary Level Children in Schools. Abstract: The study determined the proportion of children in first and second grades identified with single and multiple psychiatric disorders, the proportion of children treated with single and multiple psychiatric medications, possible adverse drug interactions for children receiving multiple medications, and attitudes of teachers concerning psychiatric medication use in elementary students.
  • Valerie Jonjak, Chippewa Falls, with faculty mentor David Jewett, associate professor of psychology. Research title: Establishing a Pre-Clinical Model of "Hunger." Abstract: Using a two-lever discrimination procedure, subjects discriminated between 22 ("hungry") and 2 hours ("satiated") food deprivation. Hypothalamic peptides ghrelin and neuropeptide-Y induced "hungry" responses. For rats in the "hungry" condition, food consumption induced "satiated" responses. Sucrose and saccharin did not. The model appears to be sensitive to factors affecting "hunger."
  • Cathy Pohl, Eau Claire, with faculty mentor Sasha Showsh, assistant professor of biology. Research title: Isolation of Azo Dye-Degrading Bacteria. Abstract: Increasing environmental concern about the appearance of color in wastewater generated from textile and paper companies has made the bio-treatment of dyeing effluents increasingly attractive to the industry. Azo dyes are reactive effluents generally considered to be recalcitrant against biodegradation. Current methods for removing azo dyes are expensive and unfeasible. We have isolated several aerobic bacteria that are able to degrade the azo dye mordant yellow XII.
  • Jeremy Treague, Danbury, with faculty mentor Harry Jol, associate professor of geography and anthropology. Research title: Searching for the Lost River and Village: An 1805 Lewis and Clark Site Along the northern Oregon Coast. Abstract: Project involved using ground penetrating radar to investigate localities mapped and described by Lewis and Clark, including the physical location of the former Clatsop River outlet along the northern Oregon coast and an associated Native village. The research coincides with the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial.
  • Dustin VanOverbeke, Springfield, Minn., with faculty mentor Paula Kleintjes, professor of biology. Research title: Is Potentilla Fruticosa a Nectar Plant for Butterflies? Abstract: Project involved observing 59 individual butterflies belonging to 11 species nectaring on Potentilla fruticosa in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. Butterflies spent 53 percent of observed nectaring time on P. fruticosa when availability was 26 percent. Significantly more mean carbohydrates were in P. fruticosa flowers excluded from nectivores (26.83 ug/2ml vs. 6 71ug/2ml).
  • James Watkins, Spooner, with faculty mentor Phillip D Ihinger, associate professor of geology. Research title: Project involved reconciling observations of the Yellowstone hotspot with the standard plume model. Abstract: The Yellowstone hotspot is the classic example of continental plume magmatism despite several observations that challenge a plume origin. This project presents a new model for the origin of Cenozoic deformation and magmatism in the western United States that reconciles the enigmatic features of Yellowstone with the standard plume model.

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