This news release describes past events and should be used for historical purposes only. Please note date of release.
UW-Eau Claire News Bureau
Schofield Hall 218
Eau Claire, WI 54702-4004
UW-Eau Claire Faculty, Staff
Set to Retire
phone (715) 836-4741
fax (715) 836-2900
web http://www.uwec.edu
e-mail newsbur@uwec.edu

MAILED: May 17, 1999

EAU CLAIRE — The University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire will lose about 483 years of collective experience when 18 of its faculty and academic staff retire this spring and summer.
The significant number of retirees from UW-Eau Claire and other UW System schools in recent years reflects the boom in hiring that the institutions of higher education underwent in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The hires of the '60s and '70s are leaving campuses behind as they reach retirement age.
"Many of UW-Eau Claire's faculty came at the same time," said Chancellor Donald Mash, noting that 100-plus faculty were hired at the university in 1965 alone. "But because of enrollment and budget reductions, which slowed hiring additional faculty, the university doesn't have adequate numbers of younger faculty in place to compensate for the loss of the older and more experienced faculty."
At UW-Eau Claire, 133 of its 407 faculty members are between the ages of 55 and 65, and 50 percent of the university's non-teaching academic staff directors are expected to retire in the next five years, Mash said.
Nearly 40 percent of UW-Eau Claire's faculty and teaching academic staff will likely retire during the next decade, according to a UW System Office of Policy Analysis and Research report. Between the 1985-86 and 1997-98 academic years, the number of faculty members 55 and older rose from 27 to 35 percent systemwide, the report stated. That contrasts with an 8 percent drop in the number of faculty members under age 40 in the same time period — from 22 to 14 percent.
While UW-Eau Claire will miss the experience and knowledge that older faculty members bring to the university, an even greater concern is the decline in the number of younger faculty in place to help fill the gap, Mash said. For example, budget cuts in the 1995-97 budget period alone eliminated 550 positions systemwide, he said.
"UW-Eau Claire has had some extraordinary faculty and staff retire in recent years, and many more will retire in the immediate future," Mash said. "To replace them in a highly competitive national marketplace, we will need to have a better pay plan in place and a more attractive benefit package than we now have."
Currently UW-Eau Claire's faculty salaries are below the average of their upper Midwest peer institutions and new hires must wait six months before receiving employee-supported health insurance.
"While our outstanding retirees will be greatly missed, strong younger faculty can energize a university. We simply need the resources to compete for top faculty in order to maintain and hopefully continue to build on our tradition of excellence," Mash said.
UW-Eau Claire faculty and staff retiring this spring and summer include:
  • Dr. Donald Ballegeer, professor of physics and astronomy, will retire after 29 years of teaching. Ballegeer, who came to UW-Eau Claire in 1970, taught introductory physics, electrical circuits/electronics, optics and clinical instrumentation for medical technologists. He also did extensive research with laser technology and optical testing. Ballegeer was a member of professional organizations such as the American Association of Physics Teachers and the American Institute of Physics. He earned a bachelor's degree from Illinois Benedictine College and a doctorate from the University of Idaho.
  • Dr. William Barnes, professor of biology, will retire after teaching at UW-Eau Claire since 1972. During his 27-year tenure at the university, Barnes taught plant ecology, ecology and general botany. He has been a member of professional organizations such as the Ecological Society of America and the Society of Conservation Biology. Barnes has published papers on the vegetation of the Chippewa River lowlands, and has done research in the area of plant ecology of the floodplain forests of the lower Chippewa River. He earned a bachelor's degree from UW-Stevens Point and master's and doctoral degrees from UW-Madison.
  • Charles Bauer, vice chancellor for business and student services, will retire after 34 years at UW-Eau Claire. In his current position, Bauer, who joined the university in 1965, is responsible for Facilities Planning and Management, Business Services, Personnel Services, Financial Aid, Institutional Planning, Internal Audit and Student Support Services (Children's Center, Housing and Residence Life, Public Safety, University Centers and Programs, and Parking and Transportation). He earned his bachelor's and master's degrees from Kearney State College in Nebraska.
  • Ada Bors, special events coordinator, will retire after serving UW-Eau Claire for 25 years. Bors was the creator of the university's annual Viennese Ball, an event that has raised more than $537,000 for scholarships, international study awards and direct payments to student musicians and production staff. She has received several honors and awards as a result of her work with the ball, including the Johann Strauss Medal from the City of Vienna and the Vienna Tourist Board. She earned bachelor's and master's degrees from Ohio University.
  • Dr. William Brown, professor of psychology, will retire after teaching for 31 years. Since coming to UW-Eau Claire in 1968, Brown has taught psychological theories courses to undergraduates, and helped prepare and place more than 20 of those students in their own doctoral level careers in psychology. He completed the La Jolla Program at the Center for Studies of the Person, where he worked with the founder, the late American psychotherapist and scholar Carl R. Rogers. He completed sponsored post-doctoral studies at the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana, the University of Minnesota, the University of California-San Diego and Colorado University at Boulder. He was a Bush Fellow at Harvard in 1984. Before coming to UW-Eau Claire, Brown was a public school teacher, counselor and athletic coach in his home state of Pennsylvania. He earned his bachelor's and master's degrees from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and his doctorate from the University of Montana.
  • Dr. Philip Chute, professor of physics and astronomy, will retire after teaching for 30 years at UW-Eau Claire. Since coming to the university in 1969, Chute has served on several university committees such as the University Planning Committee and the Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee. He was chair of the department of physics and astronomy from 1977-83 and 1997-99. Chute received the UW-Eau Claire Excellence in Teaching Award in 1979. He earned his bachelor's degree at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Indiana and his doctorate from Ohio University at Athens.
  • Dr. Wil Denson, professor of theatre arts, will retire after teaching at UW-Eau Claire since 1969. During his 30-year tenure, Denson taught acting, stage directing, theater literature and criticism, musical comedy, performance for the camera, playwriting and theater management. For years, Denson was the director of University Theatre and Summer Theatre. Eight of his playscripts have been published and 18 have been produced. He was a member of the International Association of Theatrical Stage Employees. He has received numerous awards, including the UW-Eau Claire Excellence in Service Award and the Eau Claire Regional Arts Board Individual Artist of the Year Award. Denson earned a bachelor's degree from UW-Oshkosh, a master's from the University of Arizona and a doctorate from UW-Madison.
  • W. Jack Garber, assistant professor of foundations of education, will retire after teaching at UW-Eau Claire since 1965. During his 34-year tenure, Garber has taught courses in educational media, instructional design and microcomputer courses for education. He was a member of several professional organizations such as the Wisconsin Educational Media Association. He also conducted community workshops in the areas of computers and other technologies. Garber has supervised students doing their practice teaching in area elementary schools. He earned a bachelor's degree from UW-Eau Claire and a master's from UW-Stout. He completed additional graduate work at the University of Indiana-Bloomington.
  • Dr. Richard Gunn, professor of foreign languages, will retire after teaching at UW-Eau Claire since 1968. During his 31-year tenure at the university, Gunn has taught German and English as a foreign language. He also was the foreign language department chair for several years. He earned a bachelor's degree from Eastern Illinois University, a master's from Northwestern University and a doctorate from the University of Kansas.
  • Dr. Carl Haywood, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, will retire after being a member of the university community for more than three decades. Before becoming dean in 1996, Haywood, who has been a member of the university's history department since 1967, served as assistant dean and associate dean of what was then known as the School of Arts and Sciences. He earned a bachelor's degree from Abilene Christian University, a master's from Texas Technological University and a doctorate from Boston University.
  • Ronald Koshoshek, professor of philosophy and religious studies, will retire after teaching since 1969. He taught ethics and philosophy of science and technology courses for 30 years. A recipient of the UW-Eau Claire Excellence in Service Award, he also received the Wisconsin Wildlife Federation's Conservationist of the Year Award. He earned a bachelor's degree from Holy Cross Seminary and a master's from Fordham University.
  • Dr. Johng Lim, professor of biology, will retire after teaching since 1963. Lim has taught molecular biology, molecular genetics, botany, cytogenetics, human heredity and environment and plant physiology. He received several teaching awards including the UW System Board of Regents' Wisconsin Distinguished Professorship and the UW-Eau Claire Excellence in Scholarship and Excellence in Teaching awards. During the last 15 years, he has been awarded more than $1.25 million in grants from the National Institute of Health and the National Science Foundation. During leaves from UW-Eau Claire, he was a research geneticist at the Laboratory of Genetics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, in North Carolina, and he was a visiting professor in the department of medical genetics at UW-Madison. He earned his bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees from the University of Minnesota and an associate degree from Rochester Junior College in Rochester, Minn.
  • Dr. Judith Lund, associate professor of chemistry, will retire after teaching at UW-Eau Claire since 1979. During her 20-year career, Lund taught biochemistry, general chemistry and hands-on chemistry for elementary teachers. She coordinated and participated in community outreach events for local school children. She coordinated National Chemistry Week presentations at several Eau Claire sites and led several three-week Eisenhower Hands-On Chemistry Workshops for elementary teachers. She was a member of several professional organizations such as the national and central Wisconsin sections of the American Chemical Society, and she served on various university committees. She earned her bachelor's degree from Carroll College and her master's and doctoral degrees from UW-Madison.
  • Frances Miller-Aspnes, lecturer of music, will retire after teaching the harp for 28 years on a part-time basis. Miller-Aspnes, a former member of the Minnesota Symphony Orchestra, lives in Minneapolis but has commuted to Eau Claire throughout the years to work with students interested in the harp. Shortly after UW-Eau Claire's Fine Arts Center was completed, a harp was donated to the university to ensure its music department had a complete range of instruments. An incoming freshman whom Miller-Aspnes had taught 10 years earlier was interested in studying the harp so UW-Eau Claire hired Miller-Aspnes to instruct her. In the years since, she has taught anywhere from three to 10 students a year.
  • Dr. Ronald Schlattman, professor of business communication, will retire after teaching at UW-Eau Claire since 1971. During his 28 years at the university, Schlattman's teaching specialty areas include administrative management, business communication and report writing. A former chair of the University Senate, he has chaired several committees within the College of Business and the department of business communication. He has received several teaching awards including the Outstanding Business Educator post-secondary award from the Wisconsin Business Education Association for the state of Wisconsin. He was a member of several professional organizations, including the Wisconsin Business Education Association. Schlattman earned his bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Wyoming and his doctorate from the University of Montana.
  • Dr. James Williams, associate professor of sociology, will retire after teaching since 1965. During his 34-year tenure, Williams taught courses on social problems, marriage and the family, principles of demography and social class, and perspectives on death. He received the School of Arts and Sciences Effective Teaching Award, and taught at Harlaxton College in England as part of a study abroad program. A past chair of the sociology department, he was assistant director of the Upward Bound Project for two years. He has authored numerous reports, and was the principal investigator for a project titled "Indian Health and Population Growth." His current research is in the areas of mortality and socioeconomic status, attitudes toward suicide and euthanasia, and campus climate for women and minorities. He earned his bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees from the University of Texas-Austin.
  • Dr. Alan Wunsch, associate professor of business communication, will retire after teaching at UW-Eau Claire since 1989. Wunsch taught business writing at UW-Eau Claire. He has done research in the areas of business writing, listening and communication barriers. He earned his bachelor's and master's degrees from UW-Whitewater and his doctorate at the University of California-Los Angeles.

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EW/JB


UWEC [Administrative Offices] [News Bureau]

Janice B. Wisner
UW-Eau Claire News Bureau
Schofield 218
(715) 836-4741
newsbur@uwec.edu

Updated: May 17, 1999