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Microsoft FrontPage 2003

Bulleted and Numbered Lists: Basics

Lists are an effective way to separate topics or data from the rest of the document. This document introduces bulleted/numbered lists and related terminology. It also explains how to create lists, remove them, and use sublists.

return to topIntroduction

  • This is an example of an item in a bulleted list. Note that when the text wraps, it does not wrap all the way to the bullet, but only to where the first line of text began.
  1. This is an example of an item in a numbered list.
    Again, text only wraps to the first line of text, not the number.

Bulleted lists are often referred to an unordered lists and numbered lists as ordered lists. This is because these are the terms used when working in HTML, the code browsers use to read web page data. In FrontPage, working with either type of list is essentially the same.

With bulleted lists, you can use a plain bullet character or an image bullet character. For more information on using images, refer to Working with Picture Bullets.

return to topList Terminology

The following terms will appear when changing the options for bullets and numbered lists.

Collapsible Outline

A collapsible outline is a list on a web page that expands or contracts when the user clicks it. For example, if you view the following list in Internet Explorer 4.0, you can click the second item in the main list to show or hide the sublist beneath that item.

WARNING: If you view the list in a browser that does not support collapsible outlines (e.g., Netscape Navigator 4.0, Internet Explorer 5), the entire list, including sublists will be displayed, and sublists will not disappear when clicked. See the following example:

  1. Item 1
  2. Item 2
    • Item 1 of sublist
    • Item 2 of sublist
    • Item 3 of sublist
  3. Item 3
  4. Item 4

Style Sheet

The style sheet includes a dialog box with several tabs allowing you to fine-tune a list's appearance. Be aware that not all browsers support all of these options.

return to topCreating Lists

When creating a list, you can either type the list and then add bullets/numbering or create the list as you type.

Creating a List: Text Already Typed

  1. Select the items to be in the list
    NOTE: Items must be separated by paragraph breaks, not line breaks. Paragraph breaks leave a blank line between lines of text, whereas line breaks do not.

  2. From the Style pull-down list, select Bulleted List or Numbered List
    OR
    On the Formatting toolbar, click NUMBERING or BULLETS Numbering and Bullets buttons

Creating a List: Text to Be Typed

  1. Place the insertion point where the list will begin (this must be on a blank line)

  2. From the Style pull-down list, select Bulleted List or Numbered List
    OR
    On the Formatting toolbar, click NUMBERING or BULLETSNumbering and Bullets buttons

  3. Type the first list item

  4. Press [Enter

  5. Type the next list item

  6. Repeat steps 4-5 until the list is complete

  7. To end the list, from the Style pull-down list, select Normal
    OR
    To create a blank line, after the last item, press [Enter] twice

Adding a Blank Line between Items

  1. Select all items in the list

  2. From the Format menu, select Paragraph...
    The Paragraph dialog box appears.

  3. Under Spacing, in the After text box, type the desired spacing (in points)

  4. Click OK

return to topMaking Lists Accessible for All Users

A screen reader is essential for the vision-impaired to receive information on a website. Numbered or bulleted lists not created correctly can be confusing and difficult to understand when read by the screen reader. There are some things you can do as a web developer to help ensure that your site can be used by all types of users.

Indicating the Number of List Items

Before making the list, indicate how many list items are going to appear. This will help the users anticipate the number of list, items. Making sure you introduce your list with an explanation will help clarify the information and orient the impaired user.

Using Numbers

The best way to make lists clear is to number the items. When a number is placed before each list a screen reader will read that number first before going on to the actual item. The user then will know exactly what item he/she is hearing. 

EXAMPLE:

  1. Item one
  2. Item two
  3. Item three

Using Bullets

When list items have bullets placed before them, the screen reader will ignore them and only incorporate a short pause between each list item. The user is able to distinguish the pause but may get confused between a pause used before list items and a pause used before sentences. You can make bulleted lists less problematic by introducing them and placing a period at the end of each item.

Using Image Bullets

If image bullets are used, insert the word "bullet" or use an asterisk (*) as alternate text. For instruction on how to insert alternate text, refer to Assigning Alternate Text for Images.

return to topRemoving Bullets or Numbering

Sometimes bullets or numbers are more distracting than simple lines of text. To remove a bullet or list item, follow these instructions.

Removing Bullets or Numbering from a List Item: Toolbar Option

  1. Select the item from which you want to remove the bullet or number

  2. On the Formatting toolbar, click NUMBERING or BULLETSNumbering and Bullets buttons
    NOTE: If you remove the bullet or number from the middle of a list, you will create two separate lists: one before and one after the item.

Removing Bullets or Numbering from a List Item: Keyboard Option

  1. Place the insertion point at the beginning of the item from which you want to remove the bullet or number

  2. Press [Backspace]

Removing Bullets or Numbering from a List: Toolbar Option

  1. Select the entire list

  2. On the Formatting toolbar, click NUMBERING or BULLETSNumbering and Bullets buttons

Removing Bullets or Numbering from a List: Menu Option

  1. Place the insertion point within the list

  2. From the Format menu, select Bullets and Numbering...
    The List Properties dialog box appears.

  3. Select the Plain Bullets or Numbers tab

  4. In the upper left of the dialog box, select the bullet or number style box containing no numbers or bullets

  5. Click OK

return to topUsing Sublists

Sublists show logical connections between the items of the sublist and the main list. The example below involves a numbered list; however, bulleted lists can have sublists as well. By placing Tutoring Needs and Job Placement Needs in a sublist below Student Needs, the author of the list shows these needs to be especially applicable to students. See the following example:

  1. Student Needs
    1. Tutoring Needs
    2. Job Placement Needs
  2. Faculty/Staff Needs
  3. Community Needs

Creating a Sublist: Text Already Typed

  1. Select the list item(s) to be made into a sublist

  2. On the Formatting toolbar, click INCREASE INDENT twiceIncrease Indent button
    The sublist numbers or bullets appear.
    NOTE: If you would like the sublist to have a different number style (e.g., a., b., c.), refer to Changing Numbered List Options.

Creating a Sublist: Text to Be Typed

These directions assume that you are already typing a list and want to create a sublist.

  1. If the insertion point is not on a blank line, press [Enter]

  2. On the Formatting toolbar, click INCREASE INDENT twiceIncrease Indent button
    The sublist number or bullet appears.
    NOTE: If you would like the sublist to have a different number style (e.g., a., b., c.), refer to Changing Numbered List Options.

  3. Type the first sublist item

  4. Press [Enter]

  5. Type the next sublist item

  6. Repeat steps 4-5 until the sublist is complete

  7. Press [Enter]
    The insertion point should be on a blank numbered or bulleted line.

  8. To return to the main list, on the Formatting toolbar, click DECREASE INDENT twiceDecrease Indent button
    OR
    Press [Backspace] twice

  9. Continue typing the main list

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