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Mogensen Lecture brings renowned expert on multicultural education to campus March 29

March 13, 2012
 Dr Christine Sleeter
Dr. Christine Sleeter
EAU CLAIRE — A distinguished educational researcher will offer encouragement and practical steps for educators to effectively nurture historically underserved students in their classrooms during the ninth annual Martin Mogensen Education Lecture at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.

Dr. Christine Sleeter, professor emerita in the College of Professional Studies at California State University, Monterey Bay, will present "Nurturing Intellectual Work Where You Might not Always Expect to Find It" from 4-5:15 p.m. March 29 in Room 100 of Hibbard Humanities Hall.

According to Sleeter, teachers are students' most important resources for academic learning, and despite challenges, they can make significant differences in the lives of underserved students by helping them attend to issues of poverty, and cultural and linguistic differences in effective ways. She will debunk the notion that such students are difficult to teach or that problems in their home lives hinder academic learning.

Sleeter will present strategies for teaching students from backgrounds of poverty or those who may be from immigrant or minority families and incorporate best practices that also mesh with recommendations for 21st-century leadership development.

Formerly a high school learning disabilities teacher in Seattle, Sleeter has served on the faculty at Ripon College and UW-Parkside, and has been a visiting professor at Victoria University in New Zealand, San Jose State University, San Francisco State University and University of Washington, Seattle. She currently is president of the National Association for Multicultural Education and previously served as vice president of Division K (Teaching and Teacher Education) of the American Educational Research Association. Her research focuses on anti-racist multicultural education and teacher education.

While at UW-Eau Claire, Sleeter also will hold a workshop for area educators and UW-Eau Claire faculty and staff.

The presentation, hosted by the College of Education and Human Sciences in partnership with the Martin Mogensen family, is free and open to the public.

The Mogensen Lecture Series, which is part of a teacher education outreach effort, was established to honor Martin Mogensen, a 1952 UW-Eau Claire graduate. Mogensen became one of the first victims of school shootings in this country when, at the age of 46, he was killed by a student in the Tomah school where he served as principal. His daughters, Marti Mogensen and Margaret Mogensen Nelson Brinkhaus, both graduates of UW-Eau Claire, and other family members and friends support the lecture series through the Martin Mogensen Education Lecture Fund of the UW-Eau Claire Foundation. They also established a scholarship fund as a tribute to their father.

Brinkhaus and Mary Mogensen Hardie, representing the family, will present the Martin Mogensen Education Scholarship at the lecture. It will be given to a Wisconsin education major who has attained a high level of scholarship and who shows promise for becoming a successful teacher.

For more information about the lecture or scholarship, contact Dr. Marvin Lynn at lynnm@uwec.edu or 715-836-5832.

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RD/DW

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