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Instrumentation


The Chemistry Department has a well-stocked stable of instrumentation for the isolation and characterization of molecules. These instruments have been obtained with funding from a wide range of federal, state and institutional sources. Most instruments are shared with all members of the department, with our undergraduate students being the primary users, in both course-related and collaborative research activities. Members of the Chemistry Department also have access to a range of instruments available in the Materials Science Center, which can be used for elemental and surface analyses. Below is a sampling of the instrumentation available.


Instrumentation in Chemistry


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Bruker 400 MHz Avance II
NMR Spectrometer

The spectrometer is a three-channel instrument equipped with a variable-temperature unit and 5 mm TXI/Z-gradient three-channel indirect detection probe 5 mm BBO/Z-gradient two-channel broadband probes. This instrument is also capable of CP-MAS solids experiments and has a 120 slot autosampler. Spectra are analyzed using TopSpin, Sparky and iNMR.

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Agilent 6120
LC/Mass Spectrometer

This instrument includes an Agilent model 1200 Agilent HPLC system interfaced to an Agilent 6120 Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer. Both dual ESI and APCI/ESI ionization sources. In addition to the mass detector, the HPLC also has in line diode array UV/Visible detector. Spectra are analyzed using Applied Biosystem’s Analyst and the open source mMass software.

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2 Agilent 1100 Analytical HPLC Liquid Chromatography Systems

Both systems have autosamplers and Diode Array UV/Visible detectors. Chromatograms are collected and analyzed using Agilent's Chemstation software.

mass spec

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Varian ProStar Analytical/Preparative System

This system is capable of both analytical and preparative scale separations. It has two ProStar 210 solvent delivery systems supporting flow rates up to 25 mL/min, a ProStar 335 dual path diode array UV/Visible detector, and a ProStar 410 fraction collector. Chromatograms are collected and analyzed using Varian's Galaxie software.


5 Cary UV/Visible Spectrophotometers

The department has 4 Cary-50 UV/Visible spectrophotometers, each having a Peltier temperature control unit. The department also has a high resolution UV/Visible spectrophotometer that contains Cary-14 optics, and which has been recently upgraded with OLIS electronics and software.

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2 Avatar and 2 Nexus Thermo-Nicolet FTIR Spectrometers

Sampling accessories for these instruments include 2 ATR and and 2 diffuse reflectance accessories. In addition to the DTGS detectors, there is MCT detector available for use with the Nexus benches.

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Nonius Single Crystal X-ray Diffractometer

The diffractometer is equipped with a Mo Kα radiation source(l= 0.71073 Å) and cryogenic sample cooling to 150K.  Reflections are indexed, integrated, and corrected for Lorentz, polarization, and absorption effects using DENZO-SMN and SCALEPAC.  Structures are solved by a combination of direct methods and heavy atom using SIR 97.  Hydrogen atom coordinates are assigned using SHELXL97.

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Hewlett-Packard GC/MS

The department has an HP 5890 gas chromatograph with 5970 mass spectrometer detector.


2 Shimadzu GC-14A
Gas Chromatographs

These two CG's are used primarily to support our organic chemistry courses.

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2 Hewlett-Packard
Gas Chromatographs

These two CG's are used primarily to support our analytical chemistry courses.


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Perkin Elmer XX Flame Atomic Absorptions Spectrometer

Atomic Absorption is one of the top three methods used by Analytical Scientists working in the chemical industry. Our instrument operates predominantly in a flame (Air/Acetylene) mode, and sees widespread use in teaching.

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Applied Photophysics SX.18MV Stopped-Flow System

This two-syringe system has a minimal dead time of ~1.0 ms and can measure spectra from 275 to 700 nm using a PMT, diode array, fluorescence and circular dichroism detection for sample temperatures from 2.0-80.0 °C.


Instrumentation in Materials Science


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X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer

sssd Phoibos-150 hemispherical analyzer, dual anode (Al/Mg) X-ray source, and load-lock chamber.

mass spec

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ThermoFinnigan Element2
HR-ICP-Mass Spectrometer

This instrument is used to conduct ultratrace level analyses on samples as diverse as steel and body fluids. This powerful instrument is commonly used for geological studies and water analysis. Most metals can be detected to the parts per trillion (ppt) level, including many that are often obscured in quadrupole ICP-MS work. The multi-element capabilities of the instrument enable rapid quantitative analysis.


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Asylum Research MFP-3D SA
Atomic Force Microscope

This instrument conducts three dimensional measurements on the nanoscale. The microscope is equipped with temperature controls for sample heating. The AFM can image samples in liquid environments as well as in air, making this a powerful tool in research areas including materials science and life science.

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Perkin-Elmer LS-55 Spectrofluorometer

This instrument is equipped with a single-cell Peltier cooler ( sample temperature from 0-100 °C) and is capable of measuring fluorescence, phosphorescence, and chemiluminescence from 200 to 900 nm and excitation spectra from 200 to 800 nm.

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JEOL 2010 200 kV
Transmission Electron Microscope

This instrument provides high resolution nanoscale images of materials and electron diffraction patterns, which provide crystallographic information. The TEM is capable of magnification up to 1 million times, providing spatial resolution of 1-10 nm..

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Physical Electronics PHI 680
Scanning Auger Nanoprobe

This instrument uses Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) to determine the elemental content of the first few atomic layers of a sample. It is also equipped with a scanning electron microscope and ion sputtering capabilities, allowing for depth profiling of samples.

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