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Characteristics of Asperger's Syndrome 

Each person is different. An individual might have all or only some of the described behaviors to have a diagnosis of AS. These behaviors include the following:

  • Marked impairment in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as: eye gaze, facial expression, body posture, and gestures to regulate social interaction.
  • Extreme difficulty in developing age-appropriate peer relationships. (e.g. AS children may be more comfortable with adults than with other children).
  • Inflexible adherence to routines and perseveration.
  • Fascination with maps, globes, and routes.
  • Superior rote memory.
  • Preoccupation with a particular subject to the exclusion of all others. amasses many related facts.
  • Difficulty judging personal space, motor clumsiness.
  • Sensitivity to the environment, loud noises, clothing and food textures, and odors.
  • Speech and language skills impaired in the area of semantics, pragmatics, and prosody (volume, intonation, inflection, and rhythm).
  • Difficulty understanding others’ feelings.
  • Pedantic, formal style of speaking; often called “ little professor”, verbose.
  • Extreme difficulty reading and/or interpreting social cues.
  • Socially and emotionally inappropriate responses.
  • Literal interpretation of language. difficulty comprehending implied meanings.
  • Extensive vocabulary. Reading commences at an early age (hyperlexia).
  • Stereotyped or repetitive motor mannerisms.
  • Difficulty with “give and take” of conversation.

Project Funded by the Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services through a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (CFDA #93.768)

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