print header

January 2018 Discussion Group

 

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

Facilitated by Aaron Mayo and Jose Quintana, Admissions
Dates TBD
CETL, Old Library 1142
Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates UsThis group will read Daniel Pink's Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us to help us further understand motivation. We will review what motivates us to come in to work every day and also examine what motivates the students and families that are considering UW-Eau Claire in their college search. We also will explore how motivation may vary among different groups of people to help us when we interact with people of different backgrounds. If there is a high volume of participants, we will split into two groups. One group will be admissions-focused; the other will concentrate on motivation in personal life and teaching/learning.

Diverse People Holding Hands


Spring 2018 Groups


Inclusive Pedagogy & Learning Environments

Facilitated by Jeff Goodman, Psychology

Biweekly Fridays, 3:00-4:30 p.m.
CETL, Old Library 1142

This group will read and discuss ways to design courses with varied materials, teaching methods, and learning activities to accommodate students of diverse backgrounds. Participants will also explore ideas for incorporating diversity themes into course content and learning outcomes.

Email CETL if you would like to join this group.


Cheating Lessons: Learning from Academic Dishonesty Book Group

Facilitated by Julia Lehman Caldwell and Jessica Franson, College of Business
Dates TBD
CETL, Old Library 1142

Cheating Lessons BookDealing with academic misconduct is both discouraging and time consuming for instructors. This group will read James Lang's 2013 book Cheating Lessons: Learning from Academic Dishonesty. We'll talk about course design and classroom practices that minimize opportunities for cheating and maximize opportunities for student learning. We'll talk about having an academic integrity policy, emphasizing mastery over performance, using authentic assessments, and other strategies that increase students' self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation. We also hope to explore reasons why students engage in academic misconduct, and share stories and experiences about different ways of addressing academic misconduct at its roots.

Email CETL if you would like to join this group.